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Ep. 321: Benefits of Being Barefoot

the paleo view podcast episode 321 benefits of being barefoot

In this episode, Stacy and Sarah discuss the surprising number of benefits of wearing minimalist (aka barefoot) shoes! From relieving back pain to helping prevent injury, find out the science behind why minimalist shoes work, the best way to transition into minimalist shoes, as well as Stacy and Sarah's favorites!

 

Click here to listen in iTunes

 

If you enjoy the show, please review it in iTunes!

The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 321: Benefits of Being Barefoot

    • (0:00) Intro
    • (0:40) News and Views
      • How low can they go - who has the lower voice?!
      • Get excited, Sarah is working on a new microbiome-focused book! In writing the book, Sarah has discovered some major knowledge-bombs that will rock your world!
    • (6:07) Introducing today's topic: the benefits of being barefoot and minimalist shoes
      • Stacy and Sarah both started wearing minimalist shoes when they went paleo.
      • Stacy loves Xero Shoes, especially for Stand Up Paddle-boarding (aka SUPing). They've helped her back feel better!
      • In fact, today's episode is sponsored by Xero Shoes!
      • Xero Shoes have been a game changer for Sarah when using her treadmill desk.
      • If you want a Pokemon Go friend code, message Sarah on Instagram...
      • Sarah bought her first pair of Xero Shoes - Z-Trek sandals - at the Ancestral Health Symposium!
      • The whole idea behind minimalist shoes is that your foot can move as naturally as if it's barefoot, but you have protection from sharp objects, dirt, etc.
      • Sarah is such a fan, she owns 4 pairs of Xero Shoes! And Stacy has 2 pairs of Xero Shoes!
    • (19:36) The science behind why barefoot shoes are good for you
      • 'Barefoot shoe' and 'minimalist shoe' can be used interchangeably
      • Science shows that the more material we have on our feet, the more it changes the biomechanics of our foot and leg motion in what appears to be a negative way.
      • This means most standard shoes interfere with our biomechanics and can lead to greater chance of injury.
      • Barefoot shoe studies are showing some exciting results:
        • Less stress on the knee joints
        • When you wear barefoot shoes, it carries over and can positively impact how you move when wearing standard shoes
        • Because barefoot shoes allow you to feel the ground under your feet, many more smaller muscles in your feet and ankles are activated, which strengthens your feet, lowering chance of injuries like ankle sprains
        • Training in barefoot shoes can increase muscle volume in the legs and feet and can decrease the need for orthotics
      • There is an increased risk of injury when transitioning to minimalist shoes because your feet are learning, adapting, and strengthening. This period can last up to 6 months.
      • When switching to minimalist shoes, runners will naturally correct their stride (landing on the ball of their foot first, versus landing on their heels).
      • Long term, people who are experienced in running in minimalist shoes have a lower injury rate. People who run in standard shoes have a 3.41% higher chance of injury than those wearing standard shoes.
      • Current science-supported benefits of minimalist footwear:
        • reduced risk of knee injury
        • reduced risk of injuring other joints and muscles
        • improved strength and flexibility of our legs and feet
        • improved overall biomechanics of our lower body
        • reduced chronic exertional compartment syndrome
        • increased muscle volume in our legs and feet
    • (33:06) Transitioning to barefoot shoes
      • Stacy was nervous about switching over because of past ankle injuries, but they actually improved her ankle mobility. They were so comfortable it was barely a transition.
      • Stacy wears barefoot shoes to work out and in her free time, but hasn't quite made the leap to barefoot shoes for her corporate life. It's mostly an aesthetic thing. But minimalist shoes have encouraged her to ditch the heels and wedges and switch to ballet flats at work.
      • But there are minimalist options for corporate wear.
      • And just remember - do the best you can as often as you can!
        • Try wearing regular shoes to work and barefoot shoes the rest of the time.
      • When purchasing barefoot shoes, consider the following:
        • What activity are you doing most that would benefit most from barefoot shoes?
        • Shock absorption, posture, etc.
      • It's okay to take time to transition to barefoot shoes. When Sarah first started wearing wore minimalist shoes, the bottom of her feet hurt because she was using muscles she hadn't used. Over 6 months of transitioning, whenever her feet hurt, Sarah would switch back to standard shoes.
      • If you're concerned about injury during the transition, work with a running coach!
      • If you're heavier, be aware that the risk of injury when transitioning to minimalist shoes is higher.
      • Steven from Xero Shoes recommends doing what Sarah intuitively did - wear your minimalist shoes until they start to hurt and then switch back to your standard shoes. You're using and strengthening new muscles so you need to give your feet recovery time!
      • (48:35) One study gave the following recommendation for runners transitioning to minimalist shoes, though it didn't give a firm timeframe.
        • For the first week, use minimalist shoes during lower key movement like walking, housework, shopping (not during training).
        • Then, introduce your minimalist shoes to your training routine, but reduce training volume. Start by using your minimalist shoes for 5% of your run and your standard shoes for the 95%.
        • Gradually increase the amount that you use your minimalist shoes during training.
        • Overall, Sarah thinks it's a solid recommendation and is consistent with the idea that if your feet hurt or if you get blisters it's not because you need to toughen up your feet or do more, it's because your foot is relearning how to work! Rest and recovery are an important part of the process.
        • This paper also recommends a variety of other exercises to build foot strength and mobility. They're probably exercises you're already doing in Crossfit (lacrosse ball, foam rolling, etc).
    • (54:33) Barefoot shoes for walking and everyday activities
      • Most of the studies are done with barefoot runners, but there are a few studies that have been done on walkers and they show similar benefits: better biomechanics, posture, mobility, strength, muscle size.
      • Walking more in barefoot shoes can improve your running.
      • There isn't injury data for those walking in barefoot shoes.
      • The bottom line: barefoot shoes are beneficial no matter what your sport!
    • (56:55) Wrap up and recommendations
      • Sarah has the Xero Shoes Z-Trek sandals, the new Jessie sandals (with the loop around the toe), the Prio Running Shoes, and the Daylite Hiker (great for winter!). She loves them all!
      • Xero Shoes sells replacements for all the shoe pieces - buckles, hooks, etc - so if you're rough on your shoes, they've got you covered. And the soles have a 5,000 mile warranty on them!! Amazing!
      • Stacy has the Jessie sandals and has her eye on the Lena shoes, which would be a great option for work! Stacy wears the Cloud sandals for SUPing.
      • Matt has the Prio Men's Running Shoes, which he loves.
    • Get your questions in! We want to hear from you! And there's no end to questions we can answer and topics we can address!
    • Engage on social media! That's how we get feedback!
    • Thank you for listening

Relevant posts Xero Shoes Walk Barefoot or Why LeBron is Indestructible   the paleo view podcast episode 321 benefits of being barefoot

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Ep. 320: Can a Paleo or AIP Lifestyle Manage Diabetes?

In this episode, Stacy and Sarah go beyond diet as a way to prevent or manage diabetes, exploring why Paleo and AIP lifestyle factors like activity, stress management, and sleep are critical components. Sarah also shares a list of her top nutrients picks for improving insulin sensitivity.

 

Click here to listen in iTunes

If you enjoy the show, please review it in iTunes!

The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 320: Can a Paleo or AIP Lifestyle Manage Diabetes?

    • (0:00) Intro
    • (0:40) News and Views
      • Welcome back! According to Sarah, the best way to do a podcast is in PJs!
      • Over 6 years of TPV podcasts!
      • Shout out to the listener Stacy met at the Queen City Mischief and Magic festival in VA! If you're a Harry Potter fan, mark your calendar for next year's festival!
      • Sarah realizes she doesn't need to be coy about transitioning into the podcast topic because listeners always read the episode title before listening to the podcast.
    • (10:58) Question from Kayla: "Hi Stacy and Sarah! I loved your recap podcast! I'm writing because I haven't seen a podcast yet about diabetes and AIP. I did listen to the insulin one, but I'm specifically wondering how AIP could be helpful to a diabetic. I had gestational diabetes with all four of my pregnancies, progressively worsening with each one until my last which was very hard to control. Unsurprisingly, I am now struggling with high blood sugar even though my baby was born 9 months ago. I've seen that diabetes is an autoimmune condition, but I really don't understand the mechanics so it's hard for me to be motivated to stick to the AIP diet. Would you be able to discuss that more on your podcast? Can Sarah please geek out on my behalf? Thanks so much for your amazing work!"
      • Sarah geeks out with general diabetes statistics

        • Estimated 9.3% of the American population has diabetes.
        • Type II Diabetes accounts for 95% of diabetes in America and Type I accounts for the remaining 5%.
    • (13:17) The difference between Type I and Type II Diabetes
      • Type I Diabetes is an autoimmune condition where the body's immune system is attacking the beta cells, which are the cells in the pancreas that make insulin.
      • Type II Diabetes is a diet and lifestyle disease where the pancreas can still make insulin, but the body becomes less and less responsive to it until it's unable to manage blood sugar levels. Also known as insulin resistance.
      • Because Type I diabetes is an autoimmune condition, Sarah recommends following the Autoimmune Protocol (AIP) in addition to the other suggestions in this podcast.
      • Traditional recommendations from American Diabetes Association for regulating insulin is "almost good," according to Sarah. Sarah likes their guidelines for measured carbohydrates, eating carbohydrates with protein, fat, and fiber, and focusing on whole food carbohydrates, but disagrees with their recommendations to eat whole grains and vegetable oils.
      • One study shows that the Paleo Diet does a better job at regulating blood sugar than the Mediterranean Diet.
      • Another study shows the Paleo Diet was more effective at improving glucose control and lipid profiles than the American Diabetes Association diet.
      • Currently, no studies looking at the long term effects of the Paleo Diet on diabetes.
    • (30:03) Lifestyle factors like activity, stress management, and sleep may have even more of an impact on insulin sensitivity than diet.
      • Activity improves the body's insulin sensitivity receptors, both the number of receptors and their sensitivity.
      • One study in healthy adults showed a 67% increase in amount of insulin needed to shuttle glucose out of the blood after 5 days of bedrest. People who are overweight and obese have an even greater increase in the amount of insulin needed.
      • Sedentary periods also increase blood pressure, cholesterol, and other symptoms of metabolic syndrome.
      • Taking a 2 minute activity break every 20 minutes can negate these effects. This can be as simple as getting up and moving around!
      • More muscle mass equals more insulin sensitivity, which means there's benefit to doing muscle building exercises.
      • Neither weight training nor cardio will negate the negative effects of sitting at a desk all day.
    • (39:43) Chronic stress and acute stress are big factors in determining insulin sensitivity.
      • Our fight or flight response regulates which bodily systems are prioritized. If we're constantly stressed our body isn't focusing on the immune system, digestion, reproductive functions, protein synthesis, bone formation, and regulating blood sugar.
      • Chronic stress directly causes insulin resistance via cortisol.
      • Researchers say chronic stress may be the number one contributor to metabolic system.
      • Even acute stress causes insulin resistance and hyperglycemia because it's creating readily available energy for running away or other survival mechanisms.
      • Sarah recommends working on resilience activities and managing stress. Practice saying "no," delegating, spending time in nature, cuddling, laughter, yoga, meditation, and down time.
      • Stacy asks how these studies are measuring stress. Sarah says researchers are measuring cortisol levels and analyzing participant questionnaires.
    • (49:02) Not getting enough sleep is a huge risk factor for diabetes.
      • If you get less than 6 hours per night on a regular basis, you increase your risk of Type II diabetes by 50%! And you increase your risk of either diabetes and/or pre-diabetes by 2.4 times.
      • Studies have shown that even a single night of lost sleep will make you insulin resistant.
      • One study showed for every 30 minutes of weekday sleep debt the risk of obesity is 17% higher and the risk of insulin resistance is 39% higher - even if you're getting 15 hours of sleep on the weekends.
    • (52:56) Stacy and Sarah discuss nutrients that are particularly important for insulin sensitivity.
      • First off, always check with a health care provider before taking even a supplement. Some supplements do not mix with certain drugs.
      • Vitamin D. Get your levels tested and supplement within the functional range of Vitamin D. Then retest your levels every 3 months. Vitamin D levels can change seasonally.
      • Zinc. Important for glycemic control and the immune system. Ideally get it from foods like shellfish and nuts and seeds.
      • Vitamin K2. Important for blood sugar management and can even reduce your risk of getting diabetes. Best sources are grass-fed meat, organ meat, grass-fed dairy.
      • Chromium. More relevant for those who haven't been getting a lot of nutrients and may be just starting a Paleo Diet.
      • Magnesium. Some studies show supplementation can improve glycemic control, but it's hit or miss. Data is stronger showing adequate intake of magnesium can prevent diabetes.
      • Alpha Lipoic Acid. Has been shown in clinical trials to improve insulin sensitivity in those with Type II Diabetes.
      • Berberine. Food sources can be hard to find. One source is Oregon Grapes, but they're only found in the Pacific Northwest. A couple studies have shown Berberine can be as effective as certain diabetes drugs.
      • Curcumin (from turmeric). Anti-inflammatory. Some evidence showing it can prevent diabetes in people who are at a higher risk.
      • Cinnamon. Also anti-inflammatory. Can reduce cholesterol by 18% and reduce blood sugar levels by 24%. Both Cassia and Ceylon cinnamon has this effect. Be warned, do not just eat a tablespoon of cinnamon - it will hurt!
      • Conjugated Linoleic Acid (food, not supplement). Can be found in grass-fed meat and dairy from ruminant animals. Can significantly lower risk of diabetes.
      • There is also preliminary evidence (some mixed, not conclusive) for blood sugar lowering properties of:
        • CoQ10
        • Aloe
        • Ashwagandha
        • Ginkgo
        • Green coffee bean extract
        • Glucosamine
        • Black cohosh
        • Rhodiola
        • Reishi mushroom
        • Tart cherry juice
        • White mulberry
        • Fenugreek
        • Milk thistle
        • Ginseng
        • Inositol
      • Stacy suggests one way to get some of these amazing nutrients: FourSigmatic Mushroom Hot Cocoa with Reishi and Cinnamon. For more on medicinal mushrooms check out Episode 307.
    • Get your questions in! We want to hear from you! And there's no end to questions we can answer and topics we can address!
    • Engage on social media! That's how we get feedback!
    • Thank you for listening

"diet is only one factor here. insulin resistance might be even more tied to lifestyle than to diet." Relevant posts The Paleo Diet for Diabetes American Diabetes Association Guidelines Palaeolithic diet decreases fasting plasma leptin concentrations more than a diabetes diet in patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomised cross-over trial Benefits of a Paleolithic diet with and without supervised exercise on fat mass, insulin sensitivity, and glycemic control: a randomized controlled trial in individuals with type 2 diabetes   insulin resistance might be even more tied to lifestyle than to diet graphic  

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Ep. 319: Abundance Mindset

In this episode, Stacy and Sarah talk about the power of positivity and having an abundance mindset.

Click here to listen in iTunes

 

 

If you enjoy the show, please review it in iTunes!

The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 319: Abundance Mindset

  • Intro (0:00)
  • News and Views (0:40)
    • Sarah is just back from an awesome camping trip to Black Rock Mountain!
  • Question from Aimee: "I've read some scientific papers on how emotions such as anger and anxiety increase inflammatory cytokine release and the risk of chronic disease. While I've seen the research on how negative emotions increase disease risk and progression, I'm wondering what is out there demonstrating the opposite - that gratitude, happiness, and joy DECREASE disease risk and progression. Even better - is there anything demonstrating a shift in attitude from negative to positive reduces inflammation/disease progression? Thanks!"
  • Get your questions in! We want to hear from you! And there's no end to questions we can answer and topics we can address!
  • Engage on social media! That's how we get feedback!
  • Thank you for listening!

References:

 

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Ep. 318: SAD to Paleo: How to Help Family Transition

In this episode, Stacy and Sarah discuss getting family members on board with your new diet.

 

Click here to listen in iTunes

 

 

If you enjoy the show, please review it in iTunes!

The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 318: SAD to Paleo: How to Help Family Transition

  • Intro (0:00)
  • News and Views (0:40)
    • We lost the audio for our mindfulness and positivity show! But luckily we had this show instead! We'll be back soon with our previously scheduled podcast!
    • Stacy and Sarah ironically discuss what episode number it is, but due to the lost show, we're completely wrong about the episode number
    • Sarah is going camping! Again!
  • Question: "My husband is full-on on the SAD diet and has refused to change. He says he would rather die happy. He has not been happy with his waist circumference and says he can't wait to be more active to reduce his weight (rather than change diet). In our past lives/pre-house gutting we enjoyed hiking and backpacking frequently and hope to get back into it again one day. Recently my husband had a biometric screening for work and his blood sugar was elevated. This concerned him more than years of high blood pressure and cholesterol and is now thinking of reducing his carbs. I think this may finally be the time!"
    • It sucks to be in this situation!
    • Get the food out of the house! Tell him that to support me, let's only have these foods outside the home.
    • Often they will see results and become more on board with it
    • Paleo isn't so crazy anymore! It's been around for 8-10 years. Saying I want to focus on meat and vegetables is very reasonable.
    • Talk to each other with love and respect
    • Sarah makes the analogy with smoking: people realize that eating poorly is bad for them, but no amount of begging will make them change permanently. It has to be self-motivated.
    • People are most likely to follow a diet that someone they know has used and seen visible success with
    • Have honest conversation with your spouse: I want you to be around as long as possible and I want you to care about that
    • Show that you won't be giving up their favorites with transition foods
    • Remember He Won't Know it's Paleo? She fed him paleo for a year without him finding out! You can make food tasty!
    • The problem is modern processed foods are highly palatable and hard to give up by design
    • Work together! You can make it!
    • Check out Paleo to Go for the Yes Food/No Food list
    • Culturally, food is more than nourishment. People become uncomfortable when you choose not to participate in food activity.
    • The difference between food and other addiction is that there is no way to give up food cold turkey.
    • Also, there are so many competing ideas about healthy diets.
    • Steps to transitioning: First, get the bad stuff out of the house!
    • Focus on what foods you still want to eat and focus on that! Meal plan what looks good to you!
    • See what you've done it the past to see whether gradual change or sudden change works better for you.
    • Check out Real Life Paleo for the gradual transition plan!
  • Get your questions in! We want to hear from you! And there's no end to questions we can answer and topics we can address!
  • Engage on social media! That's how we get feedback!
  • Thank you for listening!

 

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Ep. 317: How Do I Weigh Quality and Budget in Meat Products?

In this episode, Stacy and Sarah talk about the quality of meat products. What do all these terms like grass-fed, pasture-raised, and free-range mean? How do I select for quality and budget? And what should I weigh when my budget can't handle all high quality meat?

 

Click here to listen in iTunes

 

If you enjoy the show, please review it in iTunes!

The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 317: How Do I Weigh Quality and Budget in Meat Products?

  • Intro (0:00)
  • News and Views (0:40)
    • Sarah is back from her camping! It was an eventful trip full of bears, poison ivy, and meeting park rangers!
    • We're talking meat quality, and have a deal for you from ButcherBox, the best subscription for high quality meats! Sarah has a subscription and loves it!
    • Offer for paleo view listeners: $15 off + Free Bacon with a subscription (ButcherBox Bacon is uncured, free of sugar and nitrates, non-GMO verified, hormone free, made from pasture raised heritage breed pigs AND its whole30 approved!)
    • Link to use: https://www.butcherbox.com/thepaleoview/
    • No coupon needed!
    • You can also get items a la carte like Stacy does!
  • Question from Deborah: "I have been trying to find a place to get pastured chicken but even those that claim to be grass fed still are fed grains. If I eat a chicken that's been raised on grains is that going to be bad for staying on AIP?"
    • First of all, there is no such thing as grass fed chicken! They are omnivores and don't eat grass!
    • Conventionally-raised meat refers to factory farming:
      • animals are raised indoors,
      • small pens with little to no room to move
      • fed fattening grain-based diets
      • dosed with antibiotics and hormones
    • Just like eating our natural diet makes us healthier, the same is true for animals.
    • Animals are healthiest when they are
      • raised outdoors with plenty of space to move around
      • improved living conditions
      • fed a natural diet for the species animal (pasture for sheep and cows, forage for pigs and chickens)
    • Benefits:
      • more humane (Stacy was a vegetarian for years because of this concern, it feeds vegan propaganda!)
      • little need for antibiotics
      • environmentally protective (lower carbon footprint, supports family-farms, does not support monocrop industrial farming)
      • improves the nutrient-content of the meat
      • meat does not contain antibiotics (meaning their gut microbiomes are healthy) or hormones
    • grass-fed comes from an herbivore (eg. beef, bison and lamb)
    • pasture-raised comes from an omnivore (eg. chicken, turkey and pork)
    • Check out Beyond Bacon about how much we love Pork!
    • Grass-fed vs Grass-finished (Some producers “grain-finish” their meat in order to increase the size of the cattle and can be somewhat cagey about this fact.)
    • It only takes a few week of "grain-finishing" to eliminate most of the benefits of grass feeding!
    • Some producers supplement with grain so the animals are “mostly grass-fed,”
    • Organic is not the same as grass-fed; although grass-fed meat may also be organic, organic meat is not usually grass-fed.
    • What is the benefits of grass fed?
      • Frequency of E. coli contamination of grass-fed meat is extremely low compared to conventional meat in spite of the fact that while antibiotic use is routine in factory farming, antibiotics are not used at all in grass-fed animals
      • Grass-fed is higher in micronutrients: vitamin A (10 times more than grain-fed), vitamin E (three times more than grain-fed), higher in B vitamins, calcium, magnesium, and potassium.
      • Grass-fed meat also tends to have a much lower water content and is much leaner than conventional meat, which means that it is higher in protein.
      • The fats in grass-fed meat are healthier: Amounts of saturated, monounsaturated and omega-6 fatty acids are similar, but grass-fed meat contains approximately four times more omega-3 fatty acids (DHA and EPA)
      • richest known source of CLA (at least double conventional)
      • CLA is a wonder fat, a natural transfat that reduces cancer risk, reduces cardiovascular disease, helps with weight loss (reduces appetite, inhibits fat production, stimulates the breakdown of fat, increases metabolism), reduces diabetes via reducing inflammation-induced insulin resistance
    • Pigs are also omnivores; their natural diet includes plants of all kinds, bugs, small animals and carrion.
    • Pasture-raised pigs are healthier too, with far, far lower rates of contamination with antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria (notably salmonella and E. coli).
    • The meat from pigs raised on pasture tends to be leaner overall, contains more omega-3 fats and less omega-6 fats, lower in saturated fat, higher in monounsaturated fat, and higher in protein, higher in vitamins B1 and B2, vitamin E, antioxidant phenolic compounds, and tends to be higher in zinc, copper and iron.
    • Pork fat (lard) is one of the highest natural sources of dietary Vitamin D!
    • See Beyond Bacon, of course, on how to make it!
    • Chickens and turkeys are omnivores; their natural diet includes grains, grasses, and bugs (they’re not vegetarians!)
    • Pasture-raised chickens are healthier too, with far, far lower rates of contamination with antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria (notably salmonella and E. coli).
    • We don't eat a lot of poultry because of its fatty acid profile. Poultry is the richest source of omega-6 of any animal food
    • conventional chicken fat is almost 20 percent omega-6 as a percentage of total energy, more than canola oil (19 percent omega-6) and not too far behind peanut butter (22.5 percent)
    • chicken contributes an average of 13 percent of the omega-6 content to the average American diet!
    • “Free-range” isn’t enough to turn the fatty acid tables. Research focusing on the effects of different poultry farming methods (caged versus free-range) and diets (conventional, organic, or pasture access) have had mixed results and suggest that the labeling we associate with higher-quality chicken doesn’t guarantee a better fatty acid profile for the birds.
    • Some studies of cereal-fed chickens with or without access to pasture show no difference in omega-3 to omega-6 ratio, unless the birds’ intake of cereal grains is deliberately restricted (which sometimes increases their levels of the omega-3 fats.
    • Likewise, meat from chickens that pasture-graze in the spring but not in other seasons tends to have higher levels of omega-3 fats.
    • And some studies of free-range versus conventional chicken have shown that free-range breast and thigh meat has a worse omega-3 to omega-6 ratio than the same meat from conventionally raised birds!
    • One study found that chickens fed soy-containing diets had an omega-3 to omega-6 ratio of 1:8, while those fed soy-free diets had a much improved ratio of 1:3.
    • Another study of chickens raised predominantly on grasshoppers showed that those chickens had an omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acid ratio of approximately 1:7
    • studies of chickens supplemented with large amounts of flax seeds were able to achieve a 1:1 ratio of omega-3 to omega-6 (although a high percentage was ALA as opposed to DHA and EPA).
    • For comparison, a chicken labeled “organic free-range” had a typical ratio of 1:11.6, and a chicken labeled “non-organic free-range” had a ratio of 1:11.3.
    • Studies of turkey have shown similar omega-3 to omega-6 patterns related to diet and forage access.
    • Of course, grass-fed and pasture-raised meat tends to be more expensive. But, you’re getting denser protein, more vitamins and minerals and healthier fats!
    • Get for grass-fed and pasture-raised when buying cheaper, fattier cuts (like 80/20 ground beef, a nicely marbled steak, or pork shoulder), since toxins are stored in fat and to take full advantage of the healthier fats and higher levels of fat-soluble vitamins in high quality meat.
    • buy leaner cuts (strip steaks, chicken breast or pork tenderloin) from conventional sources.
    • when we can’t afford to have all our meat come from grass-fed, pastured, and wild sources (or can’t access these products where we live), even conventional meat provides essential nutrition that we can’t do without.
  • Get your ButcherBox! Offer for paleo view listeners: $15 off + Free Bacon with a subscription (ButcherBox Bacon is uncured, free of sugar and nitrates, non-GMO verified, hormone free, made from pasture raised heritage breed pigs AND its whole30 approved!) Link to use: https://www.butcherbox.com/thepaleoview/
  • Get your questions in! We want to hear from you! And there's no end to questions we can answer and topics we can address!
  • Engage on social media! That's how we get feedback!
  • Thank you for listening!

  Relevant q  

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Ep. 316: Is the Carnivore Diet Healthy?

In this episode, Stacy and Sarah are worried about the growing popularity of the carnivore diet. Where did this bizarre idea come from and why is it that people claim that it makes them feel good? And why is Sarah pulling out her hair in frustration about this topic?

 

Click here to listen in iTunes

 

If you enjoy the show, please review it in iTunes!

The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 316: Is the Carnivore Diet Healthy?

    • Intro (0:00)
    • News and Views (0:40)
      • Welcome back! Sarah is steamed like a veggie and ready to climb onto a soapbox!
      • We thought that we had this covered when we emphasized how important veggies were to your health is shows like Episode 281 and Episode 286
      • But the carnivore trend has been persistent, so we thought we should address it directly
      • We've been hearing about it for a while, but it first came to our attention with a viral video about a man who only fed his family steak.
      • Stacy was shocked! How are those kids getting their nutrients?!
    • Question from Anna: "My husband has heard from several successful people who swear by a carnivore diet (Zooko Wilcox for example). It's a diet that cuts out plant foods, which to me sounds absolutely horrendous, but he wanted to try it because he has a much higher need for protein than I do and is usually craving red meat. I told him he was crazy, but spent the next 2 days essentially shoving red meat down his throat. This convinced him that consuming only meat was maybe a little much and he's back on the green wagon with me. It did leave me wondering though as to the potential for a carnivore diet to work with some people. Meat has all 20 amino acids and if you include organ meat, then I wonder if that would cover all your bases for vitamins and minerals. I'm curious, is there is any validity to such a diet if done right? Or if it is just slowly breaking down the body by depleting the consumer of some (or several) things?"
      • Stacy questions Anna's consumption of Oreos, while Sarah is totally on board.
      • Stacy recommends Trader Joe's Jojos, while Sarah prefers the dairy-free Glutino chocolate sandwich cookies.
    • Question from Janet: "I've been on the AIP for quite a while now, and was on a more general paleo diet for years before that. I think I know *a bit* about healthy eating at this point, and understand the general concepts. But, I've been hearing about the carnivore diet lately, and it's leaving me stumped. I've heard anecdotes about it curing autoimmune issues (I'm assuming because it cuts out the same foods AIP does, plus a whole lot more), making people feel younger, people losing weight, and somehow also still feeling healthy. Someone close to me (no, this isn't a "a friend wanted me to ask you…" question) is considering it, and before I scream "NO!" I thought I'd see if you ladies had any input… What's the science? Is there any? Shouldn't they all have scurvy? How can they not be incredibly sick, without any vegetables in their life?"
      • Diet was pioneered by Shawn Baker who will sell you the Carnivore Diet System coaching. That's a red flag!
      • Check out our Insulin show about why at least some carbs are important as well as our show about the dangers of ketogenic diets.
      • Shawn Baker had his medical license revoked in 2017 in part for incompetence.'
      • He was taken seriously because he was a good athlete (records in indoor rowing) and so seemed to "prove" that it worked
      • Only one study, a case study, from the 30s investigated a carnivore diet. A man attempted to copy the Inuit diet and Belview hospital observed him. Back then, though, our ability to measure health wasn't as advanced. He was eating a lot of organ meat, including raw organ meat.
      • He didn't get scurvy, but that's probably due to the raw organ meat, which has Vitamin C.
      • Meanwhile, Shawn Baker isn't eating organ meat and hasn't done any bloodwork to check in on his health at all! He's also spending so much time attacking science and claiming outlandish claims about mineral demands of the body go down when you eat only meat.
      • He's advocating a diet that will hurt people AND sowing distrust of science and the scientific method!
      • Yes, science can change, but the method is refining our knowledge and it gives us a base to point to when we try to decide what will be best.
      • Many people out there are trying to prey upon people's trust for money.
      • There are lots of carnivore diet articles that address short time success. But honestly, that's probably due to the boredom effect: eating the same food over and over again will make you eat less of it, reducing calorie intake.
      • Also, meat is highly satiating, meaning you are satisfied quicker and longer, leading to reduced caloric intake.
      • And rapid weight loss is not great and if you do it with a nutrient deficiency you will cause health issues!
      • The claims of nutrient requirements going down is not backed up by scientific studies
      • While we find evolutionary biology to be fascinating, it's not proof of anything. It functions as a hypothesis for nutritional science.
      • Despite what is claimed, hunter-gatherers when through great lengths to find vegetable material to eat! Even the Inuits had a lot of plants in their diet, about 15%.
      • The farther south you go, the more plant matter is consumed by hunter-gatherers, up to more than 50%!
      • There are no vegan hunter-gatherers and there are no carnivore hunter-gatherers! Everyone is an omnivore
      • Often meat consumption is over estimated because male ethnographers mainly studied male hunters, not the gatherer section of the population
      • People will cite studies of "carnivore" hunter-gatherers that do not support such a claim at all!
      • Three main things missing on a carnivore diet: Vitamin C, fiber for the gut microbiome, and phytochemicals
      • We get a lot of Vitamin C added in things with citric acid, ascorbic acid, etc. which often will stave off scurvy
      • Fiber is the main food of the most beneficial gut microbes. Cutting them out could make you sick!
      • Plant phytochemicals are anti-aging and anti-cancer!
      • Also not enough folate, Vitamin E and Vitamin K.
      • Scurvy symptoms take a while to show up. We store vitamin C, so it takes time to deplete it. Also, small amounts can stave off the major symptoms
      • Scurvy is a thing! A study found Vitamin C deficiency in 5-17% of the population, especially in younger people. Is that because of low carb diets?
      • Scurvy takes about a month to start setting in, more or less. Initially, there are flu like symptoms: feeling unwell, fatigue, fever, nausea, diarrhea, pain in joints and muscles, bleeding at hair follicles.
      • Major symptoms: bleeding gums, loose teeth, bulging eyes, brown and scaly skin, bruising, breaking hair, slow healing woulds, bleeding and swelling joints. It's very hard to get to that point in modern society!
      • People talk about a lot of symptoms on carnivore forums. They're often scurvy symptoms or GI issues from shifts in gut microbiome.
      • Sarah talks about the gut microbiome in What Is the Gut Microbiome? And Why Should We Care? and also in her fiber ebook Fantastic Fiber
      • Many things are labeled as "non-essential" nutrients. But these are nutrients that you don't need to keep living, but are probably essential to good health! You still want and need them!
      • This is all why our paleo diet emphasizes vegetable consumption.
    • Get your questions in! We want to hear from you! And there's no end to questions we can answer and topics we can address!
    • Engage on social media! That's how we get feedback!
    • Thank you for listening!

  Relevant posts The Link Between Meat and Cancer The Diet We’re Meant to Eat, Part 1: Evolution & Hunter-Gatherers The Diet We’re Meant to Eat, Part 2: Physiological & Biological Evidence The Diet We’re Meant to Eat, Part 3: How Much Meat versus Veggies? The Case for More Carbs: Insulin’s Non-Metabolic Roles in the Human Body The Importance of Vegetables Is It Better to Eat Veggies Raw or Cooked? The Importance of Nutrient Density

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Ep. 315: The Scoop on Red Light and Infrared Therapy

In this episode, Stacy and Sarah tackle red light and infrared therapy and whether it's true science or fake quackery!

 

Click here to listen in iTunes

 

 

If you enjoy the show, please review it in iTunes!

The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 315: The Scoop on Red Light and Infrared Therapy

    • Intro (0:00)
    • News and Views (0:40)
      • Stacy went to the lake (and the boats stayed on the roof!) and has finally learned to stand and paddle her board!
      • Sarah's kids have been at school for almost a month and she now has a middle schooler!
      • Cole turned 13, so Stacy now has a teenager! School starts for her this week!
      • This week's podcast is sponsored by Joov! If you want to check out Joov's light therapy boxes, visit https://joovv.com/paleoview
      • Joovv is the main consumer product on the market that optimizes all the variables needed to hit that therapeutic window. Many other products out there use dosages and power outputs that are too low to achieve benefits, don’t use the right wavelengths, or don’t target large enough areas of our bodies (or better yet, target our entire body!).
      • New FDA-approved electrostatic-coated LEDs that deliver even more intensity and have passed rigorous 3rd-party testing.
      • Brand new modular design that lets you build a full-body Joovv system now—OR over time. The cool thing is that you can start with just one Joovv, and add on to it over time. Sort of like legos for light therapy!
      • Lastly, all Joovvs now come with a cool built-in Bluetooth control that’s compatible with their new app as well as multiple connected home devices like Alexa and Google Home. “Alexa, I want to Joovv for 10 minutes.”
      • Sarah loves hers and wants to build a whole room of them to stand in!
    • Question from Terri: "I am considering purchasing a Red Light Therapy device...I have read about the sweet spots and the NM needed to be beneficial. I don't want to waste any money, so.....are they effective, or just a fad? I am most interested in skin rejuvenation, surface capillaries, joint and muscle effects. Thank You. Sarah, I value your advice. There are so many scam artists "out there"....hard to know what to believe!!!"
      • Sarah believes in red light therapy because it's so well supported by scientific research!
      • Dates back to the 1960s, when we discovered that low-level laser light caused mouse hair to grow back more quickly and also stimulated wound healing
      • By the 1970s, low-level lasers on humans treated non-healing skin ulcers.
      • Research on this therapy has grown to include various skin benefits (including wrinkle reduction!), weight loss, oral health improvement, improved muscle recovery, better sleep quality, enhanced thyroid health, reduced joint pain and inflammation
      • Super well researched: over 3,000 published clinical studies on light therapy, including over 200 of them double-blinded, randomized, and placebo-controlled (the gold standard!).
      • How does it work? It excites chromophores in your mitochondria and stimulates the energy chemical ATP to form!
      • Induces transcription factors that play role in: protein synthesis, cytokine modulation, cell proliferation growth factors (muscle recovery, tissue repair, collagen formation), angiogenesis, tissue oxygenation, Endogenous antioxidant enzymes (SOD, iNOS), Liver regeneration, inflammatory mediators (pro and anti), CNS health (increases bone-derived neurotrophic factor)
      • Immune cells are strongly affected by red light therapy, Strongly anti-inflammatory, Improves wound healing, Reverses age-related immune dysfunction, Promotes “M1-related immunoregulation” (immune balancing), Antiviral immunity, Antitumor immunity (inhibits tumor growth in studies), Pathogeneisis of autoimmune disease
      • Effects on fibroblasts (collagen-forming cells), enhances production of basic fibroblast growth factor, increases the proliferation, maturity, and motility of fibroblasts (a type of cell that produces collagen and extracellular matrix). Resulting increase in collagen production responsible for much of the skin and joint benefits.
      • Red light also decreases joint pain! Studies have found it to be a good alternative to NSAIDs!
      • A study found that using red light therapy decreases the amount of thyroid medication needed
      • Red and near infrared light has been shown to boost collagen, smooth wrinkles, enhance tone, boost healing and skin regeneration, reducing inflammation and cellular necrosis, and even combating acne. It helps with vitiligo, psoriasis, scars, and more!
      • Existing research has shown that wavelengths of 635 nm can significantly reduce overall body circumference measurements of regions that have been spot-treated, including the waist, thighs, upper arms, and hips (and, studies are increasingly showing that these effects remain in place long-term!).
      • There is an ideal wavelength for red light therapy. The best absorption by our tissues peaks in the ranges of 660-670 nm and 830-850 nm
    • Currently, Joovv is the main consumer product on the market that optimizes all the variables needed to hit that therapeutic window. Many other products out there use dosages and power outputs that are too low to achieve benefits, don’t use the right wavelengths, or don’t target large enough areas of our bodies (or better yet, target our entire body!).
    • Get your questions in! We want to hear from you! And there's no end to questions we can answer and topics we can address!
    • Engage on social media! That's how we get feedback!
    • Thank you for listening!

   

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Ep. 314: Is Melatonin Safe?

In this episode, Stacy and Sarah discuss melatonin and whether it is safe to use for sleep

 

Click here to listen in iTunes

or download and listen by clicking the PodBean Player below

 

If you enjoy the show, please review it in iTunes!

The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 314: Is Melatonin Safe?

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Ep. 313: The Bone Broth Show Part 2

In this episode, it's been years since we've talked about it, so let's rediscover how much bone broth rules!

 

Click here to listen in iTunes

 

If you enjoy the show, please review it in iTunes!

The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 313: The Bone Broth Show Part 2

  • Intro (0:00)
  • News and Views (0:40)
      • Sarah's kids are back at school! Time is now SQUINCHED!
    • Rapid Fire Broth Questions!
      • Can I reuse bones, and if yes how many times?

        • Until they are crumbly! With chicken this might be one time
        • First time is more collagen, more times is more minerals.
      • Mine never gels! To gel or not to gel, does it really matter?

        • Not really. It just means more collagen in the broth. You'd need a lot of skin or connective tissue to get gelling or more concentration
        • Try chicken feet or pig feet or ox tail or ham hocks or chicken heads if you want that. And it's cheap!
        • Tip: skim off the scum that rises after ten minutes or dump and refill after ten minutes for a better, less bitter broth!
      • Is two hours really long enough for broth in the the instant pot?
        • That would be fine, but we do several cycles of two hours for best broth. 2 for chicken, 4 for beef
        • Divide by four for what you would do on the stove top.
      • How can you consume bone broth with a histamine intolerance?
        • Histamine is created by immune cells in an allergic reaction.
        • Lots of food contain histamine, particularly meat foods. Its converted histadine
        • In The Paleo Approach, Sarah has a list of every food that has been tested for histamine. But there is no study that has broth as a high histamine food!
        • If you're having problems, make your own from cold bones and don't keep it at room temperature.
        • Check out our collagen show for more!
      • I’m struggling with the taste, any tips? When do I add my veggies when making it?
        • Make sure you're skimming or dumping the bitter scum!
        • Don't add your veggies too soon! Only in the last hour of cooking!
        • Take the fat off, but don't reuse it! That fat is oxidized and not good for eating!
        • Try different kinds of broth! Any animal will make a broth!
        • Salt your broth so it's not so bland!
        • And if you don't want to drink a mug of broth, that's totally fine too! Add it to recipes, make soup!
      • Do you need apple cider vinegar to make broth and if yes, why?
        • No you don't! It's supposed to help demineralize bones. But you're not adding enough to actually do anything.
        • And it doesn't add free glutamate either
      • Does it matter if I buy the more expensive, or will any bone broth do? Are there bone broths as good as homemade?
        • Kettle and Fire, of course! It's made with real grass fed bones.
        • Keep in mind that broth is not nutrient rich. It's for the collagen mostly! You need a quality base for that broth.
      • When drinking broth is there any other ingredient needed to aid in the absorption?
        • Check out the amino acid show! You'll absorb the amino acids very well with broth.
      • If you forget your broth overnight is it spoiled?
        • Did it simmer over night or was it off and sitting?
        • Hey! Just boil it for ten minutes to disinfect.
        • The important thing is are there food particles in there? Because bacteria needs something to cling to.
      • How often should you drink/cook with it to have gut health benefits?
        • Depends on the overall quality of your diet! Are you getting a lot of other collagen?
        • For AIP people, Sarah says 1/2 C per day
        • Take whatever applies to your life and make that a habit!
      • Why is it now so popular when it’s been around forever?
        • Because it's amazing!
        • Stacy noticed it started its revival when Brodo started in New York City
        • Plus it has been popularized by GAPS diet and Weston A. Price Foundation as well.
        • It's also a way to use your food more!
        • Stacy recommends Hungry Harvest as well
      • Is it true that microwaving kills the good stuff?
        • Absolutely not! It's the same as heating any other way!
    • Get your questions in! We want to hear from you! And there's no end to questions we can answer and topics we can address!
    • Engage on social media! That's how we get feedback!
    • Thank you for listening!

       

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Ep. 312: 6 Year Podversary Show

In this episode, we're 6 years old! Let's celebrate by talking favorite episodes!

 

Click here to listen in iTunes

If you enjoy the show, please review it in iTunes!

The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 312: 6 Year Podversary Show

     

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