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the paleo view podcast episode 326 the olive oil-cast

This might come as a surprise, but olive oil is one of the best fats for your gut microbiome so Sarah and Stacy are dedicating the entire hour to magical oil! They're are breaking down all the science behind what makes olive oil so great, its variety of impressive health benefits, which type of olive oil is best, and why you should be using olive oil in all of your cooking (including cakes)!

Click here to listen in iTunes

If you enjoy the show, please review it in iTunes!

The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 326: The Olive Oil-cast!

    • (0:00) Intro
    • (0:40) News and views
      • Big news! Stacy's family has a new addition: an 8 week old Boston Terrier puppy! Since she snorts like a pig, they've named her Penelope (after the movie).

        • Stacy is glad they waited til now to get a pet because the boys (particularly Cole and Finn) are at the perfect age where they can responsibly look after a pet.
    • (8:30) Today's topic: Olive Oil!
      • In researching her upcoming new microbiome-focused book, Sarah has discovered a lot of cool, exciting information about olive oil!

        • Side note:

          • Book title and pre-order dates will be announced soon-ish
          • This isn't a specifically 'Paleo' book, but since it's about gut health, there's a lot of overlap
      • A big thanks to our episode sponsor, Fresh Pressed Olive Oil Club!
        • Fresh Pressed Olive Oil Club is a monthly subscription that sends the highest quality olive oil right to your door.
        • All oils are hand-selected by club founder, T.J. Robinson, aka the Olive Oil Hunter and one of the world’s leading authorities on olive oil.
        • We've got a special, limited offer for our listeners: $1 for a $39 bottle when you sign up for a membership! Take advantage of this offer before they run out: freshpressedoliveoil.com/thepaleoview
    • (18:41) The science behind what makes olive oil so great
      • What's in olive oil that makes it so healthy?

        • Olive oil is very unique in terms of fatty acid composition. Olive oil is up to 83% oleic acid, which is responsible for many of the cardiovascular benefits.
        • It's also very high in vitamin E, particularly the most important form of vitamin E, alpha-tocopherol.
        • It also has a least 30 types of phenolic compounds which are anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, potentially anti-tumor. These phenolic compounds are the big difference between a cheap olive oil and a high quality extra virgin olive oil.
      • Olive oil health benefits
        • It can lower markers of inflammation like C-reactive protein.

          • In rheumatoid arthritis, olive oil supplementation can reduce joint pain and swelling. In fact, olive oil and fish oil can mediate the effects of arthritis.
        • It can lower risk of cardiovascular disease
        • Increase microbial diversity in the microbiome
        • It can lower blood pressure
        • Lower LDL cholesterol
        • Improves blood vessel health
        • Decreases risk of stroke
        • Early evidence suggests it can reduce the risk of Alzheimer's
        • Studies show olive oil rich diets may aid weight loss
          • Improved blood sugar regulation and improved insulin sensitivity
          • These studies an mainly done within the context of the Mediterranean Diet
    • (29:48) Olive oil and the gut microbiome
      • There's a variety of animal studies looking at high fat diets and whether the type of fat matters. The short answer? It does.

        • Palm oil, butter oil, and safflower oil reduce gut diversity and increase "unhealthy" gut bacteria.
        • Your microbiome is one of the biggest drivers of your health.
        • Olive oil is the second best type of fat for supporting Bifidobacteria and Lactobacillus and microbial diversity in the gut. The best is fish oil, but it's not great for cooking.
      • Studies show refined olive oil doesn't have these effects as extra virgin olive oil. The phytochemical content of extra virgin olive oil is key in mediating the microbiome benefits.
      • Sarah is fascinated by all this information because she wasn't expecting there to be another fat other than fish oil that was almost equally as beneficial for the microbiome.
        • The caveat is that Sarah hasn't seen any papers on avocado oil at this point so the jury's still out on that one. She'll let you know when she finds something!
      • Stacy raises the point that our gut microbiomes don't love high fat diets because our gut bacteria needs carbs to thrive (because it's what they eat) so when you limit carbs, you limit food for your gut bacteria, which can limit diversity.
        • Though coconut oil has benefits, it's not the best option for your gut microbiome.
        • Stacy has found when she limits saturated fats, especially since she doesn't have a gall bladder, her body functions better, especially in the digestive category.
    • (48:46) Olive oil as a cooking fat
      • Studies show olive oil is remarkably stable under heat exposure.

        • One study showed it took 24 hours of frying before it created enough oxidized fats to be considered harmful.
        • Another study showed after 36 hours of heating it still retained most of its vitamin E content.
      • The phenolic compounds help to stabilize the fats and make them more resistant to oxidation.
        • Olive oil has a similar effect in the body and makes our LDL cholesterol harder to oxidize.
        • A high quality extra virgin olive oil can have a smoke point of 410 degrees F. But it must be a high quality, phenolic compound rich olive oil like those from Fresh Pressed Olive Oil Club.
      • Two simple home tests to make sure your olive oil is high quality:
        • It doesn't smoke at temperatures of up to 410 degrees F.
        • It causes you to want to cough when ingested (that's because of the high phenolic compound content!).
      • Other tips for choosing a high quality olive oil
        • Look for a harvest date on the bottle versus a "best by" date. The fresher the olive oil, the better it is for you. Ideally it has been harvested within the past year.
        • Olive oils should always be in a dark glass bottle. Not clear. Not plastic.
        • Imported olive oils are more likely to be deceptively labelled and can even be cut with soy bean oil, canola oil, etc.
        • Look for local, estate olive oils.
      • Sarah goes through olive oil ten times faster than she does any other cooking in her home these days!
        • Stacy prefers to use olive oil in more savory cooking because she finds it has a strong, distinct flavor.
        • However, Sarah loves olive oil for cake recipes! She finds it makes a very moist cake with a large crumb, which is helpful for grain-free cake recipes. Look for some of these recipes in her upcoming book or on her blog.
    • Get your questions in! We want to hear from you! And there's no end to questions we can answer and topics we can address!
    • Engage on social media! That's how we get feedback!
    • Thank you for listening

Resources Olive Oil Redemption: Yes, It's a Great Cooking Oil! 3 Reasons Why Olive Oil is Amazing Which Fats Should You Eat? Lemon Rosemary Olive Oil Cake Recipe the paleo view podcast episode 326 the olive oil-cast

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In this episode, Stacy and Sarah come to the rescue for a listener in need, discussing alopecia (an autoimmune disease), as well as strategies and resources to smoothly transition your child into the Autoimmune Protocol in order to maximize healing and minimize stress - for both you and your child.

Click here to listen in iTunes

If you enjoy the show, please review it in iTunes!

The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 325: Alopecia & AIP for Kids

    • (0:00) Intro
    • (0:40) News and views
      • Stacy just returned from New York City and thinks she's coming down with a cold. Sarah is full blown sick. Send them good thoughts!
      • Stacy gives a rundown of her NYC trip with the boys. One of the highlights was visiting The New York Historical Society's 'The History of Magic' exhibit.
    • (12:20) Today's topic
      • As a parent, it can be very scary to navigate helping your child implement the Autoimmune Protocol (AIP) when you have no experience with it yourself.
      • When you're taking care of a sick child, don't forget to take care of yourself because you need to be operating at your best to give the best care.
      • Laura asks: "This week we got a pretty shocking diagnoses that my 5 year old daughter, has a rare form of alopecia and is losing all of her hair. She’s lost about 30% in the last 10 days OUT OF NOWHERE. Yesterday we got results from extensive bloodwork testing just about everything and so far it all looks normal. We haven’t gotten celiac results back yet... So clearly with Alopecia she is having autoimmune issues causing her body to turn and attack her hair follicles. We have switched over immediately to a paleo diet and limiting eggs. As little as possible sugar and processed foods, no dairy, no gluten, no beans (? This one confuses me), limited organic chicken."Eating: Healthy fats, cooked veggies, berries, quality grass fed organic beef, Alaskan wild caught salmon, some tuna fish...She cries every meal, she misses her snacks and yummy food. I’m lost and just trying to keep up and do my best. Any healthy, ‘good for her cells’ snacks you think a 5 year old would enjoy indulging on? I’m so horrible at cooking but will get better! I know there are fun things to make, which cookbooks do I need? Any favorite snack bars? Tasty breakfast options?The doctors all say nothing can be done and there’s no cure but no one talks about diet, waking up early for the sunrise, healing the gut and mitochondria... I know these are all things that can help heal her. But I’m overwhelmed, stressed, a bit broken, emotional and mourning this diagnosis (yes, I know she’s not dying but I wish hair for my 5 year old, bow loving daughter who doesn’t understand what’s happening)."
      • Stacy says it sounds like alopecia is a secondary autoimmune disease and it's likely that Laura's daughter has a primary driver like Celiac's that could be causing an alopecia flare.
      • Sarah says it is possible for alopecia to be a primary driver, but confirms it's very common for alopecia to be a secondary autoimmune disease to Celiac, Type I Diabetes, or Rheumatoid arthritis. Alopecia is most commonly linked to Celiac's.
      • Alopecia is a fairly common autoimmune disease, affecting 2% of the population at some point in their lives. On set is most typically in childhood.
      • Alopecia is among group of autoimmune diseases that is considered "self limiting." It can flare up and then, out of nowhere, go away.
      • Alopecia is strongly linked to stress.
    • (25:30) Is AIP effective for alopecia?
      • It's hard to answer how effective the Autoimmune Protocol is for alopecia. There's mostly anecdotal evidence at this point.
      • There was a recent study testing AIP on people with Chronn's disease and Ulcerative Colitis and most were in full clinical remission after just 6 weeks.
      • There's currently a study in progress that tests AIPs effectiveness on Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and Sarah will shout those results from the rooftops as soon as they're released!
      • At least 6 people with alopecia have shared their stories with Sarah. They've reported full hair regrowth after about a year.
        • Here's a link to a Youtuber Sarah met who used AIP to regrow hair: youtube.com/deepaberar
        • There are a lot of AIP facebook groups to join as well as AIP bloggers.
    • (31:07) AIP Snacks for kids
      • There needs to be a balance between living a lifestyle that heals us with the foods we eat. If cutting out foods your child loves is adding a huge amount of stress, that's not healing.
      • ShopAIP.com is a great resource for AIP foods and snacks (use code PALEOVIEW for 10% off).
      • Stacy recommends finding AIP or paleo snacks that are similar to snacks your child is already familiar with. For example if your child loves crackers, find a cassava-based cracker to replace it with.
      • For cookbooks, Stacy recommends Sarah's cookbooks The Healing Kitchen and The Paleo Approach Cookbook because they'll teach you about the autoimmune protocol and why it's important. About 50% of the recipes in Paleo Principles are AIP, but the great thing about Paleo Principles is that is goes into more detail of the grey areas of AIP.
      • Check out Sarah's free resource on her website, Paleo Community, which is an "all things AIP in one place" resource center.
    • (39:40) How to approach the Autoimmune Protocol with a child
      • Step 1 is learning about AIP.

        • It's about nutrient density first, elimination second.
        • Check out Sarah's resources:
          • The Paleo Approach book
          • "What is AIP?" A free resource on Sarah's website
          • Her best resource for a deep dive into AIP is The AIP Lecture Series
            • Next session starts January 7, 2019. There will only be two sessions in 2019.
            • This weekend (11/10-11/11) is the last week to pre-order the course! However, if you miss the pre-order, use the code PALEOVIEW before January 7th for a sweet discount!
            • This course, taught by Sarah, is intended for patients and caregivers.
      • Step 2 is understanding the nuances of AIP.
        • All fruits are allowed (except nightshades which are technically fruit).
        • AIP is not a low carb diet. This is good for kids because they need carbohydrates.
        • With a child, there is a "quality of life argument" to be made. If a child is crying at every meal, it might be best to manage stress by taking a slower approach and continuing to include some foods that aren't AIP (but are still nutrient dense).
        • Mindset shouldn't be underestimated in the success of AIP.
    • Get your questions in! We want to hear from you! And there's no end to questions we can answer and topics we can address!
    • Engage on social media! That's how we get feedback!
    • Thank you for listening

the paleo view episode 325 alopecia and hip for kids  

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In this episode, Stacy and Sarah sit down with Noelle Tarr of Coconuts and Kettlebells to chat about separating your self worth from your fitness goals, why fitness and health aren't the same thing, and how to approach movement with a chronic condition in a way that will benefit your health.

Click here to listen in iTunes

If you enjoy the show, please review it in iTunes!

The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 324: Noelle Tarr

    • (0:00) Intro
    • (0:40) Welcome today's special guest, Noelle Tarr of Coconuts and Kettlebells!
    • (3:43) Noelle's story
      • When Noelle was younger, she was always into fitness. She was training for triathlons and running marathons, pushing her body to the max.
      • In retrospect, she feels this was a mindset issue. People kept praising her for her skill and discipline, which fueled her obsession with controlling her body and her weight via exercise.
      • Moving through college, she "destroyed her body" doing what everyone told her was healthy - working out all the time and eating low calorie. Eventually she broke mentally, physically, and emotionally.
      • This is when Noelle found paleo (which she doesn't follow anymore). She's really thankful that paleo taught her that calories didn't matter so much and because of this, she was able to release that obsession and instead explore what her body wanted and needed.
      • Through the years she's tried different things. She used to avoid fruit because it contained sugar. She used to maintain an intense CrossFit training schedule. She's struggled with chronic back issues. She wrapped her self worth up into how much she could back squat or lift, but this just left her feeling like she was constantly in pain and never truly healthy.
      • When Noelle got pregnant, she hit the point where she was "done with it." She started asking herself why getting back to the back squats was so important to her? And if lifting heavy weights was really the only way to get fit?
      • Examining this part of her identity opened her mind to what it means to be healthy and fit. She got into PT and learning how important it is to build balance and strength throughout the entire body.
      • This had a powerful effect on her. She felt better, her weight stabilized, and she was able to maintain health by doing things she felt was right for her body, like short workouts and a lot of walking.
      • She stopped thinking about what other people were doing and what she should be doing, instead focusing on "what's going to serve my body today?"
      • Now she works with people to create a plan that's right for them, which is the basis of her program, Strong From Home.
      • Noelle's book, Coconuts and Kettlebells, covers these new ideas about fitness and particularly the mindset side of it.
    • (11:35) Sarah asks Noelle if the psychological stress of having your identity and self worth wrapped up in your exercise routine can actually make fitness detrimental to your health?
      • Noelle responds that if your self worth is tied to your ability to complete an event or achieve goals then it can be toxic long term. While this works for some, it doesn't work for a lot of others.
      • It's okay to switch up your goals and make changes based on the information you acquire about your body along the way - it doesn't make you a failure!
      • Sarah raises the notion of the fitness industry's mentality that if a little is good, a lot is better. It's the loss of moderation. Our body is not built to do it all! We see a lot of health problems in elite athletes that are related to the stress that intense physical training has on the body.
    • (17:13) Sarah asks, when you're working with a client, how do you get someone to dissociate from a goal that's going to be destructive versus productive?
      • Noelle says it's important to understand that every body is different, has different limitations, and has a different history. Everyone has their own unique capabilities.
      • Create a mindset of "more is not better. More is just more."
      • When you're working out, you're actually causing damage to your body. You're creating micro-tears in your body, which is stress on the body. You need to be able to give yourself time to recover from that.
      • It's important to find the balance point where fitness provides health and doesn't do harm. It's not uncommon for elite athletes to be some of the most unhealthy people!
      • What's your minimum effective dose? What can you get out of the smallest amount of work?
      • Stacy points out that it's important to be mindful of your own goals and your own health conditions. And it's important to be aware of how often you're exercising, how much recovery time you're giving yourself, and what type of nutrients - both macro and micro - you're giving your body to support it.
      • They're not anti-lift heavy, but they want to be clear that you don't have to lift heavy if it's not right for you!
    • (26:25) What is a rest day? What does that mean for someone with a chronic illness versus a more elite athlete?
      • When working with clients, Noelle scales the number of workout days and rest days based on their experience level. If someone is new to exercise, she recommends working out 3 days a week. At 6 months, bump it up to 4 days. And after a year, bump it up another day to 5 workout days/ week. But Noelle never recommends working out more than 5 days per week.
      • For rest day activities, Noelle recommends:
        • Walking
        • Mobility work
        • Intentional heat and ice
        • Stretching
        • Or nothing!
      • For people suffering from chronic health conditions, Noelle works with them to develop a mindset of healing. If you wake up and something feels off, you have the freedom to turn that workout day into a "restorative day" (walking, mobility) or just sleep!
        • Pushing your body to do a high intensity workout when your body doesn't feel good can be detrimental to health.
      • Noelle is a huge fan of band work.
      • When it comes to workout schedules, it's important to have options for working out and recovery so you can be flexible!
      • People get hung up on unplanned rest days because they feel shame or guilt over having missed a workout, and that can quickly snowball and throw off their entire week. But Noelle says stop beating yourself up about it and just get back on the wagon the next day. There's no point in pushing yourself to do a high intensity workout when you know something doesn't feel right.
    • (34:45) Sarah shares how she balances working out with Hashimotos and fibromyalgia and high stress levels:
      • She schedules 4 days at the gym (Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday). She goes at 7:30am and workouts out with a personal trainer at her CrossFit gym where they do whatever feels right for her that day. On powerlifting days, she just builds up to whatever is comfortable that day - somedays her back squat is 160 and other days it's 200lbs. And on days she doesn't feel good, they focus on mobility work.
      • This model has allowed her to maintain consistency. Even though she has no problem skipping a day because she doesn't feel good, it becomes really hard for her to get back the next day. Having this schedule and flexibility has been really great.
    • (37:58) Working with a personal trainer
      • A good trainer should communicate with you and should know when you're beat up and need extra rest.
      • A trainer can also help you get more in touch with your body and recognize when you're feeling rundown or even when you're feeling better than you think you are!
    • (40:00) If someone is suffering from a number of health conditions and has been primarily focused on recovery, how can they know when it's the right time to push a little harder and to what extent?
      • Stacy shares her own personal example of her chronic back issues and her struggle with getting back into exercise.

        • If she's not walking intentionally or being mindful of how she's sitting, she can aggravate her injury. It's a fine line between pushing herself and not re-injuring herself.
      • If you have chronic pain, Noelle recommends that you research to find a qualified Physical Therapist. Don't be afraid to interview several PTs and get a second opinion! Explore acupuncture and chiropractors.
      • Noelle believes there's a way to move and feel better if you have chronic pain, it can just take finding the right people to help you.
      • Working with a professional can also hold you accountable and keep you showing up for yourself, even when you're frustrated and don't feel like it.
      • Stacy has struggled with motivation because she wants to lift heavy instead of being restricted to small movements. Though its taken her some time to make peace with this disappointment, she has.
        • She had worked with a personal trainer, but the trainer's goal was to get her back to being a competitive Strong Woman, which just caused her to re-injure herself. That made her realize that she needed to take a step back and take care of mental wellbeing.
        • These days, she's thinking about joining the Y with her boys to swim this winter and she wants to make time for stretching.
      • Noelle says when we separate our self worth from fitness activities, that's where the benefit is. We allow ourselves to move on and do other things and we stop feeling "less than" because we're no longer doing that thing.
      • Noelle asks herself important questions like, "What do I want from life? How do I want to feel when I'm 75? Do I want to be limping around with a back brace and cane because I had to keep running?" And she says no! She wants to be playing with her grandkids and doing water aerobics!
    • (55:29) So how does one measure progress and success?
      • Noelle says success is not the number on the scale, despite what the fitness and diet industry want you to believe.
      • The first way you can measure success is in your blood work, your inflammatory markers, a hormone panel. Get blood work done before you start and then, 6 months later, have your blood work redone so you can compare.
      • Secondly, progress happens in small, incremental shifts, and it happens all over the place. You may get faster, your reps may increase, the amount of weight you can lift may increase. Noelle encourages you to track these stats in a notebook and notice the improvements!
      • Sarah likes to set small, realistic goals. This year she's been working on doing Toes to Bar and doing the CrossFit benchmark workout, Grace, at the prescribed weight.
      • Sarah measures her health by how she feels. How do her joints feel when she gets out of bed? Does she feel happy? Does she laugh when her kids make a joke? Does she feel energetic and focused? And what does her blood work say?
      • Stacy says when she started paleo, her goal wasn't to lose weight, it was to have energy to play with her kids. At the beginning she barely had energy to sit at the dinner table. Now she looks back at that to remember how far she's come.
      • "Fitness" and "health" are different. It's important to prioritize both.
      • Sarah says when you ask yourself what progress you've made and the answer is none, maybe you're measuring the wrong thing. Maybe the success is that you're showing up and putting in the effort!
    • (1:09:22) Wrap Up
    • Get your questions in! We want to hear from you! And there's no end to questions we can answer and topics we can address!
    • Engage on social media! That's how we get feedback!
    • Thank you for listening

 

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Ep. 323: Cheat or Treat, Let's Talk Sweets!

the paleo view episode 323 cheat or treat let's talk sweets

In this episode, Stacy and Sarah are helping you prepare for America's sugar holiday, Halloween! Find out Stacy's and Sarah's strategies for empowering their kids to make good choices around trick-or-treating candy, mindset tips for navigating sugar cravings and getting back on track after overindulging, and why raw honey is such a unique and powerful natural sweetener!

Click here to listen in iTunes

 

If you enjoy the show, please review it in iTunes!

The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 323: Cheat or Treat, Let's Talk Sweets!

    • (0:00) Intro
    • (0:40) Today's topic: how to successfully navigate the sugar holiday, Halloween!
      • Let's change the way we think about Halloween and focus on how we treat ourselves (self care) versus how we treat ourselves (sugar) to get rid of the guilt and shame mentality.
      • This topic goes beyond just Halloween. Halloween kicks off a two month stretch of indulgent holidays!
      • Think "I'm choosing to treat myself" versus "I'm cheating on my diet."
      • Sugar, in small doses, doesn't have to be detrimental to your health and it can offer some benefits like social comfort and enjoyment.
      • Paleo Treats is this week's podcast sponsor!
        • Paleo Treats "changed Sarah's world!"
        • They were one of the first paleo desserts on the scene.
        • Sarah's and Stacy's favorite Paleo Treat is the Bandito. It's like a peanut butter cup -- but paleo!
        • In addition to the Bandito, Paleo Treats has a number of delicious treats including the Cacao Now (açaí and chocolate), the Mac Attack (coconut cookie), the Mustang Bar (oatmeal cookie), the Rocket (espresso brownie), and the Brownie Bar (flourless chocolate cake).
        • The Bandito is a great options for those seeking a low sugar option because it only has 7g of sugar from honey!
        • Try these delicious treats for yourself: www.paleotreats.com/thepaleoview and use code PALEOVIEW for 10% off!
      • One strategy Sarah uses to be mindful of her dessert intake is that she'll freeze cookies or sweets. Then, when a craving strikes, she must defrost the treat, which allows time for her craving to lessen or go away. Paleo Treats are great for this because they're stored frozen!
    • (19:38) Natural Sweeteners
      • Paleo Treats uses honey to sweeten their treats (no refined sugar!).
      • In researching her new book about the microbiome, Sarah has discovered really cool research about honey, which separates it from any other sugar.
      • Before we get to honey though, Blackstrap molasses is definitely on a pedestal. One tablespoon has just 42 calories, 20% of your RDA of calcium and iron, most B vitamins, and is a great source of chromium. It has more iron per calorie than steak and more calcium per calorie than cheese.
      • Honey is non diabetogenic. For some reason that researchers are still trying to figure out, it doesn't elicit the insulin response you'd expect and doesn't seem to contribute to insulin resistance the way you'd expect.
        • Studies show that diabetics can sweeten with honey which dysregulating their blood sugar. Honey doesn't create the same response as cane sugar or maple syrup, two sweeteners that have a very similar saccharide breakdown.
        • Honey has incredible anti-microbial properties.
        • Raw honey has fermentable substrate in it, which feeds our gut bacteria. It increases microbial diversities and selectively feeds probiotic stains that are very desirable. It's incredibly beneficial to the gut microbiome! So Sarah puts honey on an equally high, but different pedestal as blackstrap molasses.
      • (24:26) Honey versus raw honey
        • There are certain properties of honey that are lost when it's pasteurized or cooked. It has unique compounds that are similar to phytochemicals that we haven't completely characterized. There really isn't another food like honey! But when you heat things, chemical structures tend to unravel which can change their function.
        • Raw honey is antibacterial, antioxidant, anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory, and antiviral. It's cardio protective, gastro protective, and can promote wound healing.
        • If you make cookies with raw honey or put a spoonful of raw honey in a cup of tea, you're going to lose some of these properties, but it's still going to be fermentable (things the gut bacteria will eat), which still benefits your microbiome.
          • Stacy's strategy to maximize the benefits of raw honey in hot tea is to let the tea cool to drinking temperature and then add the honey.
        • Honey has been shown to improve IBS both with chronic constipation and chronic diarrhea.
        • Honey is also a cough suppressant and is very soothing for the throat.
    • (30:27) Defining what a treat is
      • Stacy defines treats as anything outside the scope of a nutrient dense healing food, or what Mark Sisson would call "the 20%."
      • Sarah agrees, defining treats as anything that's not adding nutritive value to her diet, for example, gluten-free burger buns, popcorn, and rice (unless it's made with broth).
        • In her house, the most common treat foods are popcorn (once a week, maybe twice) or a sweet treat (once a week).
        • Stacy agrees, saying her family usually has a sweet treat twice a week and they try to focus on recipes that are naturally low in sugar. One of their favorites is this Chocolate Chia Seed Pudding, which has a lot of nutrient density!
      • If you're experiencing a craving, it's often because you need something. If you're craving sugar, it might be a sign that you need vitamin C, more sleep, some downtime (reducing stress), healthy fats, magnesium, calcium, etc.
        • Sometimes when Stacy has a sugar craving, she eats a clementine or an orange to get a dose of vitamin C.
    • (37:12) Approaching Halloween and making treats a choice
      • Stacy makes an agreement with her kids that they can keep a few pieces of trick-or-treating candy and they'll exchange the rest for legos or pennies - whatever they negotiate. Then Stacy removes the "exchanged candy" from their house and brings it to share at her office.
      • Sarah's kids love the ritual of trick-or-treating! Sarah goes through the candy with her kids and separates out the candy that will make them sick. Her kids will then pick the treats they want and amazingly, have the self control to eat them over an extended period of time (versus all in one sitting).
      • It's important to figure out what works for you treat-wise - what fulfills you and makes you happy! If you don't define a limit yourself, that's where temptation can creep in, leaving you feeling ashamed and guilty.
      • If you overindulge, don't dwell on it. It's over and done with so don't decide to throw in the towel and eat that other bag of candy. Move forward and start fresh!
      • If you get stuck on the "sugar rollercoaster," and have a hard time going cold turkey to reset your palette, Stacy recommends weaning yourself off sugar by upgrading your sweets to clean ingredients by making paleo cookies or eating Paleo Treats.
      • Sarah has totally experienced the slippery slope of eating one sweet and it creating a domino effect to eat the whole bag - more than once!
      • Mindset is very important when it comes to treats. Sarah recommends viewing treats as an indulgence and as a choice. If things start to unravel, there are foods she won't touch like gluten, dairy, or soy, but there are plenty of delicious treats that can be made with paleo ingredients that will set her up for a sugar rollercoaster. What's true of those days is that it stops being a choice and starts becoming a compulsion.
        • One thing Sarah has found really useful when things start to unravel is that she consciously chooses to eat the treat and be very present. She makes it a real, intentional moment, savoring the flavors, the texture, and the experience.
        • She also notices that this compulsion is a symptom of not getting enough sleep or being overly stressed and comes up with a plan for taking action to address those imbalances so the compulsions stop.
        • Dark chocolate and sometimes fruit is Sarah's go-to for a treat when she's trying to reset her compulsions.
    • (51:24) Alternative sweeteners
      • Be a mindful consumer when it comes to the new, no calorie sweeteners on the market. Think through what the ingredients are and if that's what will set you up for success.
      • Google these products, look up the ingredients and how it's made. Check the sources and read multiple articles with varying view points.
      • There is now a conclusive study in humans that stevia can disrupt progesterone and testosterone signaling.
      • Low calorie sweeteners, low glycemic sweeteners, and keto sweeteners all have problems. They either disrupt the gut microbiome, increase leaky gut, or mess with hormones.
      • The body has a far greater capacity to process a moderate and occasional amount of real sugar (honey, maple sugar, cane sugar). We can process and detox those better than sugar substitutes (even plant-derived sweeteners) like stevia.
      • If you overindulge this holiday season, eat fish, drink broth, and sleep! And check out these recovery-themed episodes:
    • Get your questions in! We want to hear from you! And there's no end to questions we can answer and topics we can address!
    • Engage on social media! That's how we get feedback!
    • Thank you for listening

Relevant posts https://www.thepaleomom.com/paleo-podcast-sugar-and-salt-cravings/ https://www.thepaleomom.com/sugar-vs-sweeteners/ https://www.thepaleomom.com/beating-sugar-addiction/ https://www.thepaleomom.com/is-sugar-paleo/ https://www.thepaleomom.com/paleo-splenda-erythritol-stevia-low-calorie-sweeteners/ https://www.thepaleomom.com/whats-the-next-superfood-sweetener/ https://www.thepaleomom.com/trouble-with-stevia/   the paleo view podcast episode 323 often times our bodies are craving things because we need something graphic

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Ep. 322: A Healthier Visit With Aunt Flo

the paleo view podcast episode 321 a healthier visit with aunt flo

In this episode, Stacy and Sarah are getting up close and personal as they answer all your questions about menstruation! Why are conventional pads and tampons dangerous? What are the signs of Toxic Shock Syndrome? What safer period products and brands should I be using? And how the heck do I use a menstrual cup?!

 

Click here to listen in iTunes

 

 

If you enjoy the show, please review it in iTunes!

The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 322: A Healthier Visit With Aunt Flo

    • (0:00) Intro
    • (0:40) Getting right to today's topic: menstruation!
      • Disclaimer: If you typically listen to our podcast with your kids in the room, please note that this episode discusses female reproductive anatomy and feminine hygiene products.
      • Today we're answering your questions about menstruation, including what products you should and shouldn't be using, the chemicals and questionable substances used in conventional products, and how it impacts female health.
      • This topic came about back in September, when Stacy's period caught her by surprise on a trip. She was traveling without a menstrual cup (which she's used for 7+ years) and had to make the decision between pads and tampons.
        • When Stacy switched to a cup, it reduced the length of her period, as well as the amount and intensity of cramping.
        • Sharing her experience on social media sparked a lot of questions about the cup and safer menstruation practices, so we're here to dive into the science behind your questions!
      • Sarah rarely uses tampons because intuitively, they always felt unsafe to her. As she dove into the research, it backed up her suspicions. But the good news is that there are so many safer options!
      • Stacy and Sarah take a walk down memory lane, remembering the pads that were available on the market when they first started menstruating.
      • Listeners - if you have a menstruation product and you love it, go to Stacy's Instagram and/or Sarah's Instagram posts for this podcast episode and leave a comment about what you're using and why you love it!
    • (14:29) So what is the problem with conventional pads and tampons?
      • It boils down to the fact that these materials aren't regulated. The companies are trying to solve the problem of "does this absorb liquid" without considering other important health factors.
      • The vagina and vulva are mucus membranes that are highly absorbent, so there's the potential for those areas to absorb the chemicals and other known problematic materials used in conventional products. This can lead to chronic health problems like cancer.
      • Research was almost non-existent for vaginal health until the 1990s. The earliest research was on sexually transmitted infections and how personal lubricants could affect the rate of infection transmission.
      • These studies discovered chemicals like glycerine - which is still used in personal lubricants today - damages and irritates the vaginal barrier tissue.
      • Funding for women's health studies is stunningly low. Thir party organizations like non profit advocacy groups have taken on the responsibility of doing this type of testing because it's incredibly important.
    • (20:55) Female sex organs are highly absorptive
      • Female sex organs are "self cleaning" because they need to be able to get rid of the foreign material introduced during intercourse. It's lined with mucus which provides a barrier and prevents bacteria from latching on and washes away harmful microorganisms.
      • Like our gut, skin, and sinuses, vaginal tissues (including the external parts) are also semi-permeable. But they're much more absorptive than skin.
      • Studies show hormones get into the blood stream very easily through the vaginal barrier. One hormone, when taken both vaginally and orally, was 10x stronger when delivered vaginally. This means you need to be mindful of everything that comes into contact with that area!
      • For more on the regulation (or lack there of) of personal care products check out Episode 275: Cancer Risk from Personal Care Items.
      • Beyond tampons and pads, also beware of vaginal wipes, personal lubricants, douches, vaginal perfumes - anything you're putting in contact with your lower regions.
      • Even though the vagina is more absorptive than the intestines, there has never been a peer-reviewed study that measures the absorption of pesticides, dioxins, etc, from tampons or pads into the vagina. Crazy!
      • Always avoid personal care items with fragrances! Fragrances are a "catch all" category for companies to put any ingredient they want without disclosing it. There are harmful fragrances that are added to tampons and pads which are known endocrine disrupters.
    • (29:32) Chemicals in conventional tampons and pads
      • Dioxins. Women absorb more dioxins through tampons than food in polluted areas.
      • Furans. A chemical used to bleach tampons so they're white.
      • Parabens. Endocrine disrupter and carcinogen.
      • Pesticide residue. Third party testing has found at least 8 different detectable pesticide residues in one common brand of tampons.
      • If you're spending money for grass-fed and organic foods, and clean self care products, this is something you need to be concerned about!
    • (32:14) Toxic Shock Syndrome
      • In the 70s and 80s there was a dramatic rise in toxic shock syndrome (TSS) when tampons became more widely used. At that time, 4 different types of synthetics were being used. After studies, 3 of those materials were removed from the market.
      • TSS is caused by a toxin secreted by Staph. Aureus, a very common and problematic bacteria. During menses, the vagina creates a great breeding ground for Staph. Aureus and when you use a tampon, you're creating an even better environment for this bacteria to grow.
      • TSS can be fatal. It doesn't occur frequently, but when it does, it requires medical care.
        • Major symptoms of TSS include:

          • Sudden high fever
          • Dizziness when going from sitting to standing (caused by sudden low blood pressure)
        • Lesser symptoms:
          • Nausea
          • Vomiting
          • Rash resembling a sunburn, particularly on the palms of hands and soles of feet
          • Muscle aches
          • Confusion
          • Headaches
        • If you experience these symptoms, cease using a vaginal product and seek medical attention immediately. Treatment includes a high dose of antibiotics.
      • Recent studies show that 100% cotton tampons potentially create a higher risk of TSS (versus synthetic/cotton blends tampons), though earlier studies showed they have a lower risk. So it's not cut and dry.
      • When it comes to menstrual cups, medical grade silicone cups have a lower rate of Staph. Aureus growth. Most cups on the market these days are medical grade silicone, but it's important to check.
        • Make sure you follow the recommended cleaning instructions when using a cup!
      • TSS is not limited to using vaginal products. It can result from other means.
      • About 80% of us make antibodies against Staph Aureus, so our bodies knock it out before becoming TSS.
    • (47:12) Recommended menstrual products and brands
      • Every woman is different so it's important to experiment and find the right fit for your cervix, comfort, and lifestyle!
      • Organic cotton disposable pads
        • Natracare
        • The Honest Co
        • Organyc
        • Seventh Generation
      • Reusable pads
        • Oko Creations
        • Glad Rags
        • Luna Pads
        • Saathi Pads
        • Pink Daisy
      • Organic cotton tampons
        • Cora
        • Seventh Generation
        • Natracare
        • Maxim
        • Puristics
        • Organyc
      • Reusable Natural Sponge Tampons
        • Jade & Pearl
        • Poseidon
        • Constantia Beauty
        • Natural Intimacy
        • The Sea Sponge Company
      • Menstrual Cups
        • Diva Cup
        • Lunette
        • Yukki
        • Anigan Evacup
        • Fleurcup
        • Super Jennie
        • Lena cup
      • Period Panties
        • Modibodi
        • PantyProp
        • Lunapantie
        • THINX
        • Harebrained
        • Anigan StainFree Panties
        • Vv SkiVvys
        • Dear Kate
    • (53:22) Listener Questions
      • "How do I choose the best cup for me?"

        • Stacy swears by this quiz: https://putacupinit.com/quiz/
        • Finding the right size cup for you is very important because if you're using a cup that doesn't fit you well, there's a risk of a prolapsed bladder, cervix, and/or uterus.
        • If your cup feels weird in any way, it's the wrong size! If you find a cup doesn't work for you, your next best options are a natural sponge or an external product like reusable pads or period panties.
      • "How long does a cup last?"
        • For Stacy, one cup lasted 6 years. The stem broke. So it's a much more environmentally-friendly option!
      • "I’m so intrigued but I can’t comprehend how you get it in and out, and it doesn’t spill?"
        • Stacy says she's never had a problem with the cup spilling (except for that one time her cup fell in the toilet!)
        • The cup is also the only product she's used that has an air tight seal so when you're swimming, it keeps everything where it should be.
        • When inserting, you fold the edges of the cup and insert it with a twisting motion. It should naturally unfold as you're inserting.
        • In terms of leakage, chances are incredibly slim that a cup of menstruation will spill all over you. However, if the cup overflows, a little leakage can occur.
        • For removal, while sitting on a toilet, grab pinch the stem and squeeze the base of the cup to release the airtight seal. Then gently remove the cup. It should come out easily. Definitely practice this at home before attempting this in a public restroom.
        • When in doubt, check out YouTube for "how to" videos.
        • You don't have to remove the cup every time you use the bathroom.
        • It's also more sterile! No external strings or material to absorb other body fluids.
      • "Does it actually shorten your period?" and "Is there less blood?"
        • Yes, it can shorten your period, and it can feel like there's less blood, but the uterine lining is still shedding the same amount.
        • How heavy your period or how long it lasts really depends on hormones, stress, thyroid, etc. Tampons are a physical stressor so it could be changing the quality of your period. Fragrances, chemicals, and materials like plastics can also mess with period quality.
      • "Is there a downside for the cup holding liquid inside that long?"
        • The downside is just creating an environment for Staph. Aureus to grow, which can turn into TSS. But this is a slim chance.
        • Companies do make wipes for cleaning your cup during the day, but Stacy believes that it's safer to just avoid removing your cup in public restrooms and therefore avoid exposing it to other potentially harmful bacteria.
        • Stacy and Sarah recommend having two cups so you can sterilize one while using the other. Stacy sterilizes hers by running it through the dishwasher.
      • "Cup versus soft disk?"
        • Stacy doesn't have experience with this. And it didn't come up in Sarah's research for the show. Stacy is weary of them because they contain plastic.
        • Do you use one? Go to Stacy's Instagram and/or Sarah's Instagram posts for this podcast episode and leave a comment about what you're using and why you love it.
      • "Can menstrual cups be used safely with IUDs?"
        • If your cup fits properly, it's not touching your cervix so it shouldn't be an issue (but check with your medical professional).
      • "I have a 4th degree tear from a baby. Will a cup be comfortable?"
        • You won't know until you try, but make sure you get a cup that fits.
        • Stacy recommends a natural sponge or a period panty if the cup doesn't feel good.
      • "I'm having a baby next month. What about post-partum?"
        • Doctors recommend not inserting anything into your vagina for a period of time after giving birth due to risk of infection, so follow their advice!
        • It's okay to use the pads they give you at the hospital after giving birth - do what you need to do! - but then find a safer pad option using the list above.
    • Get your questions in! We want to hear from you! And there's no end to questions we can answer and topics we can address!
    • Engage on social media! That's how we get feedback!
    • Thank you for listening

Relevant posts Aunt Flow's Gone Au Naturale: Product Reviews

A Question for Women's Health: Chemicals in Feminine Hygiene Products and Personal Lubricants

Chem Fatale Report: Potential Health Effects of Toxic Chemicals in Feminine Care Products Role of female intimate hygiene in vulvovaginal health: Global hygiene practices and product usage

Menstrual Cup Linked to Toxic Shock Syndrome, New Study Finds

the paleo view episode 322 toxic chemicals are often put in store brand menstrual products

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Ep. 321: Benefits of Being Barefoot

the paleo view podcast episode 321 benefits of being barefoot

In this episode, Stacy and Sarah discuss the surprising number of benefits of wearing minimalist (aka barefoot) shoes! From relieving back pain to helping prevent injury, find out the science behind why minimalist shoes work, the best way to transition into minimalist shoes, as well as Stacy and Sarah's favorites!

 

Click here to listen in iTunes

 

If you enjoy the show, please review it in iTunes!

The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 321: Benefits of Being Barefoot

    • (0:00) Intro
    • (0:40) News and Views
      • How low can they go - who has the lower voice?!
      • Get excited, Sarah is working on a new microbiome-focused book! In writing the book, Sarah has discovered some major knowledge-bombs that will rock your world!
    • (6:07) Introducing today's topic: the benefits of being barefoot and minimalist shoes
      • Stacy and Sarah both started wearing minimalist shoes when they went paleo.
      • Stacy loves Xero Shoes, especially for Stand Up Paddle-boarding (aka SUPing). They've helped her back feel better!
      • In fact, today's episode is sponsored by Xero Shoes!
      • Xero Shoes have been a game changer for Sarah when using her treadmill desk.
      • If you want a Pokemon Go friend code, message Sarah on Instagram...
      • Sarah bought her first pair of Xero Shoes - Z-Trek sandals - at the Ancestral Health Symposium!
      • The whole idea behind minimalist shoes is that your foot can move as naturally as if it's barefoot, but you have protection from sharp objects, dirt, etc.
      • Sarah is such a fan, she owns 4 pairs of Xero Shoes! And Stacy has 2 pairs of Xero Shoes!
    • (19:36) The science behind why barefoot shoes are good for you
      • 'Barefoot shoe' and 'minimalist shoe' can be used interchangeably
      • Science shows that the more material we have on our feet, the more it changes the biomechanics of our foot and leg motion in what appears to be a negative way.
      • This means most standard shoes interfere with our biomechanics and can lead to greater chance of injury.
      • Barefoot shoe studies are showing some exciting results:
        • Less stress on the knee joints
        • When you wear barefoot shoes, it carries over and can positively impact how you move when wearing standard shoes
        • Because barefoot shoes allow you to feel the ground under your feet, many more smaller muscles in your feet and ankles are activated, which strengthens your feet, lowering chance of injuries like ankle sprains
        • Training in barefoot shoes can increase muscle volume in the legs and feet and can decrease the need for orthotics
      • There is an increased risk of injury when transitioning to minimalist shoes because your feet are learning, adapting, and strengthening. This period can last up to 6 months.
      • When switching to minimalist shoes, runners will naturally correct their stride (landing on the ball of their foot first, versus landing on their heels).
      • Long term, people who are experienced in running in minimalist shoes have a lower injury rate. People who run in standard shoes have a 3.41% higher chance of injury than those wearing standard shoes.
      • Current science-supported benefits of minimalist footwear:
        • reduced risk of knee injury
        • reduced risk of injuring other joints and muscles
        • improved strength and flexibility of our legs and feet
        • improved overall biomechanics of our lower body
        • reduced chronic exertional compartment syndrome
        • increased muscle volume in our legs and feet
    • (33:06) Transitioning to barefoot shoes
      • Stacy was nervous about switching over because of past ankle injuries, but they actually improved her ankle mobility. They were so comfortable it was barely a transition.
      • Stacy wears barefoot shoes to work out and in her free time, but hasn't quite made the leap to barefoot shoes for her corporate life. It's mostly an aesthetic thing. But minimalist shoes have encouraged her to ditch the heels and wedges and switch to ballet flats at work.
      • But there are minimalist options for corporate wear.
      • And just remember - do the best you can as often as you can!
        • Try wearing regular shoes to work and barefoot shoes the rest of the time.
      • When purchasing barefoot shoes, consider the following:
        • What activity are you doing most that would benefit most from barefoot shoes?
        • Shock absorption, posture, etc.
      • It's okay to take time to transition to barefoot shoes. When Sarah first started wearing wore minimalist shoes, the bottom of her feet hurt because she was using muscles she hadn't used. Over 6 months of transitioning, whenever her feet hurt, Sarah would switch back to standard shoes.
      • If you're concerned about injury during the transition, work with a running coach!
      • If you're heavier, be aware that the risk of injury when transitioning to minimalist shoes is higher.
      • Steven from Xero Shoes recommends doing what Sarah intuitively did - wear your minimalist shoes until they start to hurt and then switch back to your standard shoes. You're using and strengthening new muscles so you need to give your feet recovery time!
      • (48:35) One study gave the following recommendation for runners transitioning to minimalist shoes, though it didn't give a firm timeframe.
        • For the first week, use minimalist shoes during lower key movement like walking, housework, shopping (not during training).
        • Then, introduce your minimalist shoes to your training routine, but reduce training volume. Start by using your minimalist shoes for 5% of your run and your standard shoes for the 95%.
        • Gradually increase the amount that you use your minimalist shoes during training.
        • Overall, Sarah thinks it's a solid recommendation and is consistent with the idea that if your feet hurt or if you get blisters it's not because you need to toughen up your feet or do more, it's because your foot is relearning how to work! Rest and recovery are an important part of the process.
        • This paper also recommends a variety of other exercises to build foot strength and mobility. They're probably exercises you're already doing in Crossfit (lacrosse ball, foam rolling, etc).
    • (54:33) Barefoot shoes for walking and everyday activities
      • Most of the studies are done with barefoot runners, but there are a few studies that have been done on walkers and they show similar benefits: better biomechanics, posture, mobility, strength, muscle size.
      • Walking more in barefoot shoes can improve your running.
      • There isn't injury data for those walking in barefoot shoes.
      • The bottom line: barefoot shoes are beneficial no matter what your sport!
    • (56:55) Wrap up and recommendations
      • Sarah has the Xero Shoes Z-Trek sandals, the new Jessie sandals (with the loop around the toe), the Prio Running Shoes, and the Daylite Hiker (great for winter!). She loves them all!
      • Xero Shoes sells replacements for all the shoe pieces - buckles, hooks, etc - so if you're rough on your shoes, they've got you covered. And the soles have a 5,000 mile warranty on them!! Amazing!
      • Stacy has the Jessie sandals and has her eye on the Lena shoes, which would be a great option for work! Stacy wears the Cloud sandals for SUPing.
      • Matt has the Prio Men's Running Shoes, which he loves.
    • Get your questions in! We want to hear from you! And there's no end to questions we can answer and topics we can address!
    • Engage on social media! That's how we get feedback!
    • Thank you for listening

Relevant posts Xero Shoes Walk Barefoot or Why LeBron is Indestructible   the paleo view podcast episode 321 benefits of being barefoot

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Ep. 320: Can a Paleo or AIP Lifestyle Manage Diabetes?

In this episode, Stacy and Sarah go beyond diet as a way to prevent or manage diabetes, exploring why Paleo and AIP lifestyle factors like activity, stress management, and sleep are critical components. Sarah also shares a list of her top nutrients picks for improving insulin sensitivity.

 

Click here to listen in iTunes

If you enjoy the show, please review it in iTunes!

The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 320: Can a Paleo or AIP Lifestyle Manage Diabetes?

    • (0:00) Intro
    • (0:40) News and Views
      • Welcome back! According to Sarah, the best way to do a podcast is in PJs!
      • Over 6 years of TPV podcasts!
      • Shout out to the listener Stacy met at the Queen City Mischief and Magic festival in VA! If you're a Harry Potter fan, mark your calendar for next year's festival!
      • Sarah realizes she doesn't need to be coy about transitioning into the podcast topic because listeners always read the episode title before listening to the podcast.
    • (10:58) Question from Kayla: "Hi Stacy and Sarah! I loved your recap podcast! I'm writing because I haven't seen a podcast yet about diabetes and AIP. I did listen to the insulin one, but I'm specifically wondering how AIP could be helpful to a diabetic. I had gestational diabetes with all four of my pregnancies, progressively worsening with each one until my last which was very hard to control. Unsurprisingly, I am now struggling with high blood sugar even though my baby was born 9 months ago. I've seen that diabetes is an autoimmune condition, but I really don't understand the mechanics so it's hard for me to be motivated to stick to the AIP diet. Would you be able to discuss that more on your podcast? Can Sarah please geek out on my behalf? Thanks so much for your amazing work!"
      • Sarah geeks out with general diabetes statistics

        • Estimated 9.3% of the American population has diabetes.
        • Type II Diabetes accounts for 95% of diabetes in America and Type I accounts for the remaining 5%.
    • (13:17) The difference between Type I and Type II Diabetes
      • Type I Diabetes is an autoimmune condition where the body's immune system is attacking the beta cells, which are the cells in the pancreas that make insulin.
      • Type II Diabetes is a diet and lifestyle disease where the pancreas can still make insulin, but the body becomes less and less responsive to it until it's unable to manage blood sugar levels. Also known as insulin resistance.
      • Because Type I diabetes is an autoimmune condition, Sarah recommends following the Autoimmune Protocol (AIP) in addition to the other suggestions in this podcast.
      • Traditional recommendations from American Diabetes Association for regulating insulin is "almost good," according to Sarah. Sarah likes their guidelines for measured carbohydrates, eating carbohydrates with protein, fat, and fiber, and focusing on whole food carbohydrates, but disagrees with their recommendations to eat whole grains and vegetable oils.
      • One study shows that the Paleo Diet does a better job at regulating blood sugar than the Mediterranean Diet.
      • Another study shows the Paleo Diet was more effective at improving glucose control and lipid profiles than the American Diabetes Association diet.
      • Currently, no studies looking at the long term effects of the Paleo Diet on diabetes.
    • (30:03) Lifestyle factors like activity, stress management, and sleep may have even more of an impact on insulin sensitivity than diet.
      • Activity improves the body's insulin sensitivity receptors, both the number of receptors and their sensitivity.
      • One study in healthy adults showed a 67% increase in amount of insulin needed to shuttle glucose out of the blood after 5 days of bedrest. People who are overweight and obese have an even greater increase in the amount of insulin needed.
      • Sedentary periods also increase blood pressure, cholesterol, and other symptoms of metabolic syndrome.
      • Taking a 2 minute activity break every 20 minutes can negate these effects. This can be as simple as getting up and moving around!
      • More muscle mass equals more insulin sensitivity, which means there's benefit to doing muscle building exercises.
      • Neither weight training nor cardio will negate the negative effects of sitting at a desk all day.
    • (39:43) Chronic stress and acute stress are big factors in determining insulin sensitivity.
      • Our fight or flight response regulates which bodily systems are prioritized. If we're constantly stressed our body isn't focusing on the immune system, digestion, reproductive functions, protein synthesis, bone formation, and regulating blood sugar.
      • Chronic stress directly causes insulin resistance via cortisol.
      • Researchers say chronic stress may be the number one contributor to metabolic system.
      • Even acute stress causes insulin resistance and hyperglycemia because it's creating readily available energy for running away or other survival mechanisms.
      • Sarah recommends working on resilience activities and managing stress. Practice saying "no," delegating, spending time in nature, cuddling, laughter, yoga, meditation, and down time.
      • Stacy asks how these studies are measuring stress. Sarah says researchers are measuring cortisol levels and analyzing participant questionnaires.
    • (49:02) Not getting enough sleep is a huge risk factor for diabetes.
      • If you get less than 6 hours per night on a regular basis, you increase your risk of Type II diabetes by 50%! And you increase your risk of either diabetes and/or pre-diabetes by 2.4 times.
      • Studies have shown that even a single night of lost sleep will make you insulin resistant.
      • One study showed for every 30 minutes of weekday sleep debt the risk of obesity is 17% higher and the risk of insulin resistance is 39% higher - even if you're getting 15 hours of sleep on the weekends.
    • (52:56) Stacy and Sarah discuss nutrients that are particularly important for insulin sensitivity.
      • First off, always check with a health care provider before taking even a supplement. Some supplements do not mix with certain drugs.
      • Vitamin D. Get your levels tested and supplement within the functional range of Vitamin D. Then retest your levels every 3 months. Vitamin D levels can change seasonally.
      • Zinc. Important for glycemic control and the immune system. Ideally get it from foods like shellfish and nuts and seeds.
      • Vitamin K2. Important for blood sugar management and can even reduce your risk of getting diabetes. Best sources are grass-fed meat, organ meat, grass-fed dairy.
      • Chromium. More relevant for those who haven't been getting a lot of nutrients and may be just starting a Paleo Diet.
      • Magnesium. Some studies show supplementation can improve glycemic control, but it's hit or miss. Data is stronger showing adequate intake of magnesium can prevent diabetes.
      • Alpha Lipoic Acid. Has been shown in clinical trials to improve insulin sensitivity in those with Type II Diabetes.
      • Berberine. Food sources can be hard to find. One source is Oregon Grapes, but they're only found in the Pacific Northwest. A couple studies have shown Berberine can be as effective as certain diabetes drugs.
      • Curcumin (from turmeric). Anti-inflammatory. Some evidence showing it can prevent diabetes in people who are at a higher risk.
      • Cinnamon. Also anti-inflammatory. Can reduce cholesterol by 18% and reduce blood sugar levels by 24%. Both Cassia and Ceylon cinnamon has this effect. Be warned, do not just eat a tablespoon of cinnamon - it will hurt!
      • Conjugated Linoleic Acid (food, not supplement). Can be found in grass-fed meat and dairy from ruminant animals. Can significantly lower risk of diabetes.
      • There is also preliminary evidence (some mixed, not conclusive) for blood sugar lowering properties of:
        • CoQ10
        • Aloe
        • Ashwagandha
        • Ginkgo
        • Green coffee bean extract
        • Glucosamine
        • Black cohosh
        • Rhodiola
        • Reishi mushroom
        • Tart cherry juice
        • White mulberry
        • Fenugreek
        • Milk thistle
        • Ginseng
        • Inositol
      • Stacy suggests one way to get some of these amazing nutrients: FourSigmatic Mushroom Hot Cocoa with Reishi and Cinnamon. For more on medicinal mushrooms check out Episode 307.
    • Get your questions in! We want to hear from you! And there's no end to questions we can answer and topics we can address!
    • Engage on social media! That's how we get feedback!
    • Thank you for listening

"diet is only one factor here. insulin resistance might be even more tied to lifestyle than to diet." Relevant posts The Paleo Diet for Diabetes American Diabetes Association Guidelines Palaeolithic diet decreases fasting plasma leptin concentrations more than a diabetes diet in patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomised cross-over trial Benefits of a Paleolithic diet with and without supervised exercise on fat mass, insulin sensitivity, and glycemic control: a randomized controlled trial in individuals with type 2 diabetes   insulin resistance might be even more tied to lifestyle than to diet graphic  

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Ep. 319: Abundance Mindset

In this episode, Stacy and Sarah talk about the power of positivity and having an abundance mindset.

Click here to listen in iTunes

 

 

If you enjoy the show, please review it in iTunes!

The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 319: Abundance Mindset

  • Intro (0:00)
  • News and Views (0:40)
    • Sarah is just back from an awesome camping trip to Black Rock Mountain!
  • Question from Aimee: "I've read some scientific papers on how emotions such as anger and anxiety increase inflammatory cytokine release and the risk of chronic disease. While I've seen the research on how negative emotions increase disease risk and progression, I'm wondering what is out there demonstrating the opposite - that gratitude, happiness, and joy DECREASE disease risk and progression. Even better - is there anything demonstrating a shift in attitude from negative to positive reduces inflammation/disease progression? Thanks!"
  • Get your questions in! We want to hear from you! And there's no end to questions we can answer and topics we can address!
  • Engage on social media! That's how we get feedback!
  • Thank you for listening!

References:

 

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Ep. 318: SAD to Paleo: How to Help Family Transition

In this episode, Stacy and Sarah discuss getting family members on board with your new diet.

 

Click here to listen in iTunes

 

 

If you enjoy the show, please review it in iTunes!

The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 318: SAD to Paleo: How to Help Family Transition

  • Intro (0:00)
  • News and Views (0:40)
    • We lost the audio for our mindfulness and positivity show! But luckily we had this show instead! We'll be back soon with our previously scheduled podcast!
    • Stacy and Sarah ironically discuss what episode number it is, but due to the lost show, we're completely wrong about the episode number
    • Sarah is going camping! Again!
  • Question: "My husband is full-on on the SAD diet and has refused to change. He says he would rather die happy. He has not been happy with his waist circumference and says he can't wait to be more active to reduce his weight (rather than change diet). In our past lives/pre-house gutting we enjoyed hiking and backpacking frequently and hope to get back into it again one day. Recently my husband had a biometric screening for work and his blood sugar was elevated. This concerned him more than years of high blood pressure and cholesterol and is now thinking of reducing his carbs. I think this may finally be the time!"
    • It sucks to be in this situation!
    • Get the food out of the house! Tell him that to support me, let's only have these foods outside the home.
    • Often they will see results and become more on board with it
    • Paleo isn't so crazy anymore! It's been around for 8-10 years. Saying I want to focus on meat and vegetables is very reasonable.
    • Talk to each other with love and respect
    • Sarah makes the analogy with smoking: people realize that eating poorly is bad for them, but no amount of begging will make them change permanently. It has to be self-motivated.
    • People are most likely to follow a diet that someone they know has used and seen visible success with
    • Have honest conversation with your spouse: I want you to be around as long as possible and I want you to care about that
    • Show that you won't be giving up their favorites with transition foods
    • Remember He Won't Know it's Paleo? She fed him paleo for a year without him finding out! You can make food tasty!
    • The problem is modern processed foods are highly palatable and hard to give up by design
    • Work together! You can make it!
    • Check out Paleo to Go for the Yes Food/No Food list
    • Culturally, food is more than nourishment. People become uncomfortable when you choose not to participate in food activity.
    • The difference between food and other addiction is that there is no way to give up food cold turkey.
    • Also, there are so many competing ideas about healthy diets.
    • Steps to transitioning: First, get the bad stuff out of the house!
    • Focus on what foods you still want to eat and focus on that! Meal plan what looks good to you!
    • See what you've done it the past to see whether gradual change or sudden change works better for you.
    • Check out Real Life Paleo for the gradual transition plan!
  • Get your questions in! We want to hear from you! And there's no end to questions we can answer and topics we can address!
  • Engage on social media! That's how we get feedback!
  • Thank you for listening!

 

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Ep. 317: How Do I Weigh Quality and Budget in Meat Products?

In this episode, Stacy and Sarah talk about the quality of meat products. What do all these terms like grass-fed, pasture-raised, and free-range mean? How do I select for quality and budget? And what should I weigh when my budget can't handle all high quality meat?

 

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The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 317: How Do I Weigh Quality and Budget in Meat Products?

  • Intro (0:00)
  • News and Views (0:40)
    • Sarah is back from her camping! It was an eventful trip full of bears, poison ivy, and meeting park rangers!
    • We're talking meat quality, and have a deal for you from ButcherBox, the best subscription for high quality meats! Sarah has a subscription and loves it!
    • Offer for paleo view listeners: $15 off + Free Bacon with a subscription (ButcherBox Bacon is uncured, free of sugar and nitrates, non-GMO verified, hormone free, made from pasture raised heritage breed pigs AND its whole30 approved!)
    • Link to use: https://www.butcherbox.com/thepaleoview/
    • No coupon needed!
    • You can also get items a la carte like Stacy does!
  • Question from Deborah: "I have been trying to find a place to get pastured chicken but even those that claim to be grass fed still are fed grains. If I eat a chicken that's been raised on grains is that going to be bad for staying on AIP?"
    • First of all, there is no such thing as grass fed chicken! They are omnivores and don't eat grass!
    • Conventionally-raised meat refers to factory farming:
      • animals are raised indoors,
      • small pens with little to no room to move
      • fed fattening grain-based diets
      • dosed with antibiotics and hormones
    • Just like eating our natural diet makes us healthier, the same is true for animals.
    • Animals are healthiest when they are
      • raised outdoors with plenty of space to move around
      • improved living conditions
      • fed a natural diet for the species animal (pasture for sheep and cows, forage for pigs and chickens)
    • Benefits:
      • more humane (Stacy was a vegetarian for years because of this concern, it feeds vegan propaganda!)
      • little need for antibiotics
      • environmentally protective (lower carbon footprint, supports family-farms, does not support monocrop industrial farming)
      • improves the nutrient-content of the meat
      • meat does not contain antibiotics (meaning their gut microbiomes are healthy) or hormones
    • grass-fed comes from an herbivore (eg. beef, bison and lamb)
    • pasture-raised comes from an omnivore (eg. chicken, turkey and pork)
    • Check out Beyond Bacon about how much we love Pork!
    • Grass-fed vs Grass-finished (Some producers “grain-finish” their meat in order to increase the size of the cattle and can be somewhat cagey about this fact.)
    • It only takes a few week of "grain-finishing" to eliminate most of the benefits of grass feeding!
    • Some producers supplement with grain so the animals are “mostly grass-fed,”
    • Organic is not the same as grass-fed; although grass-fed meat may also be organic, organic meat is not usually grass-fed.
    • What is the benefits of grass fed?
      • Frequency of E. coli contamination of grass-fed meat is extremely low compared to conventional meat in spite of the fact that while antibiotic use is routine in factory farming, antibiotics are not used at all in grass-fed animals
      • Grass-fed is higher in micronutrients: vitamin A (10 times more than grain-fed), vitamin E (three times more than grain-fed), higher in B vitamins, calcium, magnesium, and potassium.
      • Grass-fed meat also tends to have a much lower water content and is much leaner than conventional meat, which means that it is higher in protein.
      • The fats in grass-fed meat are healthier: Amounts of saturated, monounsaturated and omega-6 fatty acids are similar, but grass-fed meat contains approximately four times more omega-3 fatty acids (DHA and EPA)
      • richest known source of CLA (at least double conventional)
      • CLA is a wonder fat, a natural transfat that reduces cancer risk, reduces cardiovascular disease, helps with weight loss (reduces appetite, inhibits fat production, stimulates the breakdown of fat, increases metabolism), reduces diabetes via reducing inflammation-induced insulin resistance
    • Pigs are also omnivores; their natural diet includes plants of all kinds, bugs, small animals and carrion.
    • Pasture-raised pigs are healthier too, with far, far lower rates of contamination with antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria (notably salmonella and E. coli).
    • The meat from pigs raised on pasture tends to be leaner overall, contains more omega-3 fats and less omega-6 fats, lower in saturated fat, higher in monounsaturated fat, and higher in protein, higher in vitamins B1 and B2, vitamin E, antioxidant phenolic compounds, and tends to be higher in zinc, copper and iron.
    • Pork fat (lard) is one of the highest natural sources of dietary Vitamin D!
    • See Beyond Bacon, of course, on how to make it!
    • Chickens and turkeys are omnivores; their natural diet includes grains, grasses, and bugs (they’re not vegetarians!)
    • Pasture-raised chickens are healthier too, with far, far lower rates of contamination with antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria (notably salmonella and E. coli).
    • We don't eat a lot of poultry because of its fatty acid profile. Poultry is the richest source of omega-6 of any animal food
    • conventional chicken fat is almost 20 percent omega-6 as a percentage of total energy, more than canola oil (19 percent omega-6) and not too far behind peanut butter (22.5 percent)
    • chicken contributes an average of 13 percent of the omega-6 content to the average American diet!
    • “Free-range” isn’t enough to turn the fatty acid tables. Research focusing on the effects of different poultry farming methods (caged versus free-range) and diets (conventional, organic, or pasture access) have had mixed results and suggest that the labeling we associate with higher-quality chicken doesn’t guarantee a better fatty acid profile for the birds.
    • Some studies of cereal-fed chickens with or without access to pasture show no difference in omega-3 to omega-6 ratio, unless the birds’ intake of cereal grains is deliberately restricted (which sometimes increases their levels of the omega-3 fats.
    • Likewise, meat from chickens that pasture-graze in the spring but not in other seasons tends to have higher levels of omega-3 fats.
    • And some studies of free-range versus conventional chicken have shown that free-range breast and thigh meat has a worse omega-3 to omega-6 ratio than the same meat from conventionally raised birds!
    • One study found that chickens fed soy-containing diets had an omega-3 to omega-6 ratio of 1:8, while those fed soy-free diets had a much improved ratio of 1:3.
    • Another study of chickens raised predominantly on grasshoppers showed that those chickens had an omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acid ratio of approximately 1:7
    • studies of chickens supplemented with large amounts of flax seeds were able to achieve a 1:1 ratio of omega-3 to omega-6 (although a high percentage was ALA as opposed to DHA and EPA).
    • For comparison, a chicken labeled “organic free-range” had a typical ratio of 1:11.6, and a chicken labeled “non-organic free-range” had a ratio of 1:11.3.
    • Studies of turkey have shown similar omega-3 to omega-6 patterns related to diet and forage access.
    • Of course, grass-fed and pasture-raised meat tends to be more expensive. But, you’re getting denser protein, more vitamins and minerals and healthier fats!
    • Get for grass-fed and pasture-raised when buying cheaper, fattier cuts (like 80/20 ground beef, a nicely marbled steak, or pork shoulder), since toxins are stored in fat and to take full advantage of the healthier fats and higher levels of fat-soluble vitamins in high quality meat.
    • buy leaner cuts (strip steaks, chicken breast or pork tenderloin) from conventional sources.
    • when we can’t afford to have all our meat come from grass-fed, pastured, and wild sources (or can’t access these products where we live), even conventional meat provides essential nutrition that we can’t do without.
  • Get your ButcherBox! Offer for paleo view listeners: $15 off + Free Bacon with a subscription (ButcherBox Bacon is uncured, free of sugar and nitrates, non-GMO verified, hormone free, made from pasture raised heritage breed pigs AND its whole30 approved!) Link to use: https://www.butcherbox.com/thepaleoview/
  • Get your questions in! We want to hear from you! And there's no end to questions we can answer and topics we can address!
  • Engage on social media! That's how we get feedback!
  • Thank you for listening!

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