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Ep. 287: Should I Get a Flu Shot?

In this episode, Stacy and Sarah answer a question from a healthcare professional about mandatory flu shots.

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or download and listen by clicking the PodBean Player below

If you enjoy the show, please review it in iTunes!

 

The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 287: Should I Get a Flu Shot?

  • Intro (0:00)
  • News and Views (0:40)
    • Backstreet's Back, and so are Sarah and Stacy!
    • Reminiscing about the 90s, and Stacy breaking out into song- a rare treat!
    • Stacy is working on The Body Love series.
      • Her free ebook will be launching with this series - sign up to get it here.
      • It encourages never dieting again, a sustainable lifestyle perspective.
      • It's about finding what works for you.
    • Stacy hears feedback of people noting reduced illness and increased immune function with a health diet.
      • This is an interesting metric of health.
      • Stacy avoided the flu in multiple instances this year.
      • Sarah woke up feeling the yuk one morning, took good care of herself and never got sick.
        • As an adult its hard to take it easy and take care of yourself when you're sick.
        • Sarah has several friends who had complications from this year's flu.
        • Sarah is sick far less often that she was pre-Paleo.
      • Stacy attributes "souping" to her staying health when exposed to illness.
        • Stacy's post on Souping here.
        • Sarah's post on Souping here.
          • The nutrients in soup are quite different than other liquid-type diets like juicing.
          • It's a balanced meal with a lot of nutrient density.
          • Soup is more efficiently digested and filling than things like smoothies or juice.
        • Sometimes things like souping and vitamin C aren't enough and medicine is needed.
  • Listener Question - Science with Sarah (13:01)
    • Kelly asks, "I work in skilled nursing as an occupational therapist. My company requires taking the flu vaccine or wearing a mask from November to February. I understand the company's position looking at lost work time and revenue due to sick days. My direct supervisor says her reason for wanting all employees to take the vaccine is that if we don’t we are at an increased risk of passing the flu to our residents even if we don’t have the flu ourselves (she quotes a 30% increase). I have looked and cannot find studies to support this. I actually found from the Cochrane review and PubMed that no relation is found. I have opted not to vaccinate this year, I’m the only employee in my department to not vaccinate this season. I am wearing a mask daily and actually feel like it will decrease my risk of catching a cold. I was just wondering if there was any evidence that not taking the vaccine increases the risk for my residents. Last year I did take the vaccine in October and in January in a 2 week period was diagnosed with strep throat, sinus infection, bilateral eye, and bilateral ear infections. Was not tested for flu due to having had the vaccine."
    • Disclaimer: we realize that vaccination is a highly debated and hot topic, and all the information we are presenting is based in science. Please take this information and decide what is right for you, we are not medical professionals.
      • References for this show can be found below.
    • The flu vaccine is different than most other vaccines.
      • With all vaccines there is a very small risk of allergic reactions or adverse reactions.
      • Aside from those reactions, vaccines are completely safe.
      • Diseases like Polio, Measles, and Tetnis, which had a very high morbidity rate and were killing tens of thousands of people every year, is a different equation compared to the flu vaccine.
      • The flu virus mutates rapidly, which means the vaccine isn't as effective as other types of vaccines.
    • The flu is very virulent- with around 3 million cases every year.
      • The number of flu-related deaths every year differs quite a bit.
      • It is not usually associated with intestinal symptoms, bur rather fever, aches and pains, runny nose, sore throat, cough, and fatigue.
      • Flu increases risk of secondary infections, which is what usually causes death, not the flu itself.
      • Flu is spread through respiratory secretions.
        • Microscopic droplets of saliva are spread through coughing, even breathing.
    • The flu vaccine is based off an educated guess every year.
      • Based on data and modeling as to how it is going to mutate in the coming year.
      • Vaccines contain inactivated or dead virus for typically 2-4 strains of flu.
      • The immunity we get from flu vaccines in often very transient.
        • Estimates are that immunity from the flu vaccine lasts about 6 months.

          • This is why it is recommended to get one every year.
      • When they guess well and the vaccine matches up with the actual dominant flu viruses for the year, the vaccine is at best 50-60% effective.
        • This would decrease your chance of getting the flu by 50-60%.
        • A study showed between 2010-2015 the average flu vaccine was 41% effective.
        • During a bad guessing year, the vaccine was 14% effective.
        • The Cochrane review that Kelly referenced was a 2010 meta-analysis of 50 different studies.
          • It showed the absolute difference in the incidence of flu during a year when the vaccine was a good match was a 3% difference.

            • Unvaccinated risk of getting the flu was 4%.
            • Vaccinated risk of getting the flu was 1%.
            • A recent paper updated those statistics and shows that on average your risk of getting the flu if you are unvaccinated is 2.3% , compared to 0.9% if you are not. This is on a good match year.
      • Rationale for getting the vaccine includes:
        • You are less likely to get sick, even though the percentage seems small, it is significant.

          • 2 out of 100 who would have gotten the flu, won't if they are vaccinated.
        • Risk of hospitalization showed 14.7% chance if unvaccinated, and 14.1% in vaccinated population.
          • Benefit was much higher in the elderly.
        • The elderly (vaguely defined as those over 65) have less robust immune systems.
          • This raises the question of if the elderly are actually developing immunity against the flu.
          • Unvaccinated elderly have 6% chance of getting flu, compared to 2.4% in vaccinated.
      • The statistics regarding the flu will mean different things to different people.
        • Some people will hear there is a 2% difference in chance and want to get the vaccine.
        • Some people will hear there is a 2% difference and won't want to bother.
      • No matter how you develop immunity against the flu, whether you get the flu or the flu vaccine, it will still be incomplete immunity.
        • This is because the flu virus mutates so quickly.
        • There is always some cross-protection in both situations.
      • The flu vaccine become a really individual choice in terms of if you are an at-risk individual or you have at-risk individuals in your life.
      • Kelly mentioned that last year when she got the flu vaccine she got a lot of other infections.
        • There have been robust studies that showed no difference in side effects after vaccination.

          • Those who got the flu vaccine had more arm soreness and mild fever in the few days after.
          • There was no difference in non flu-related infections or symptoms.
        • There is a perception that if we get sick after getting a vaccine, it was the vaccine that made us sick.
          • This is unfortunate timing.
          • You were likely exposed to something before you got the vaccine.
            • Some illness can have incubation periods of two weeks or more.
      • Mandatory vaccines for health care professionals- part of Kelly's questions.
        • You are typically most contagious right before you develop symptoms.

          • This is part of the reason why the flu can spread so quickly.

            • We are out doing normal activities, not realizing we are sharing the virus with others.
            • Even when symptoms just start, we often do our normal activities.
        • Kelly reference the Cochrane paper, which was looking at whether or not health care workers getting vaccinated protected patients from the flu.
          • It showed a lack of sufficient evidence to make claims.
          • More recent evidence probably refutes this somewhat.
        • Another study looked at flu season mortality in residents of chronic care institutions.
          • There was a 10-20% decrease in mortality where staff vaccination rates were higher.

            • Staff vaccination rates of 60-70% versus 20% showed up in the mortality of the patients.
        • Healthy care givers and an at-risk population give a sensitive statistical model.
          • There is compelling evidence that health care workerss getting vaccinated can protect patients in a hospital or residential care setting.
          • This could be mostly related to herd immunity.
          • The flu won't spread as quickly when there are less hosts around to get it.
        • Wearing a mask versus getting a vaccine as a health care provider.
          • Best practices say to get as many staff vaccinated as possible.

            • Recommendation #2 is to have people wear masks.
            • Have hand sanitizer readily available and encourage hand washing.
          • Kelly thinks wearing a mask will protect her from getting a cold.
            • She is absolutely right- many illness are spread through respiratory secretions.
            • This is a great way to protect yourself and those around you.
    • There are valid arguments for the flu vaccine and not really many to be made against it.
      • Vaccines are safe and the risks are low.
      • Those with autoimmune disease don't like to vaccines because the adjuvants can cause symptoms or a flare.
        • This is often transient.
        • This definitely changes the equations, as a flare is an awful thing to go through.
    • We need a better way to vaccinate against the flu.
      • This is the number one conclusion that can be drawn from looking at the research and statistics.
    • There is a lot of information out there, and you should make the best decision for yourself.
      • In regard to Kelly's question whether or not her getting the vaccine can protect residents of the facility she works in, the science does say yes.
    • Getting the flu itself can also trigger for an autoimmune flare.
    • Stacy doesn't consider herself in a high risk category for getting the flu.
      • Even though she does have kids, she doesn't work in a medical setting, and she has the ability to take off work if she needs to should she become ill.
      • She made the best choice for her.
      • Other adults in her household have made other decisions regarding the flu vaccine.
      • Know your body and what you are comfortable with - it's your decision.
      • She feels the Doterra OnGuard blend has helped her in avoiding the flu this year.
      • She is also supporting her immune system with diet and lifestyle.
      • We all need to own that this is our choice and our body.
    • Vaccination against illness other than the flu, such as Measeles, Mumps, Diptheria is different than the flu.
      • The mortality rate is higher, as is the effectiveness of the vaccines.

        • This becomes a no-brainer to get those vaccines and contribute to herd immunity.
        • We should be able to put more than just Small Pox into extinction.
        • This is a different conversation than the flu vaccine one, because the statistics aren't as strong.
    • Stay well everybody!
    • If you have follow-up questions, reach out through the contact forms on our websites or social media.
    • If you've enjoyed the show, please recommend it to someone who might enjoy it.
      • We love when you share and when you leave reviews for us! Thanks for listening!

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Citations: Osterholm MT, Kelley NS, Sommer A, Belongia EA. Efficacy and effectiveness of influenza vaccines: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Lancet Infect Dis. 2012;12(1):36–44. Erratum in: Lancet Infect Dis. 2012;12(9):655. van den Dool C, Bonten MJ, Hak E, Wallinga J. Modeling the effects of influenza vaccination of health care workers in hospital departments. Vaccine. 2009;27(44):6261–7. Jefferson T, Di Pietrantonj C, Rivetti A, Bawazeer GA, Al-Ansary LA, Ferroni E. Vaccines for preventing influenza in healthy adults. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2010(7):CD001269.

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Ep. 286: How Many Vegetables Part 2: Lectins & Oxalates

In this episode, we're talking vegetables again! Specifically, we're talking about lectins and oxalates!

Click here to listen in iTunes

or download and listen by clicking the PodBean Player below

If you enjoy the show, please review it in iTunes!

 

The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 286: How Many Vegetables Part 2: Lectins & Oxalates

  • Intro (0:00)
  • News and Views (0:40)
    • Thank you to our listeners who have made it through all 286 episodes of our podcast, bad jokes, puns and all!

      • Sarah shares her current favorite pun.
      • Matt and Stacy's son Cole would be rolling his eyes.
    • The gap between what parents and kids think Youtube is for and how they use it.
      • Sarah's been breaking out "when I was a kid" a lot lately to her daughters.
    • We got amazing positive response from the vegetable podcast last month.
      • We love that our listeners love learning and gaining information!
      • Thanks for tagging us in your photos and letting us know we're helping you to eat more veggies!
      • If you haven't listened to the first veggie podcast yet, it lays the groundwork for today's episode.
  • Listener Questions (12:50)
    • LECTINS: Bits and pieces from questions by listeners Sarah and Rita regarding the The Plant Paradox diet, which an very anti-lectin diet and involves eliminating grains, legumes, nightshades, as well as large number of vegetables and fruits with a higher lectin content, such as most things with skin and seeds.

      • Listener Sarah would love to hear Sarah's take on lectins and any other information on the recommendations in this book.
      • Lectins are a broad class of carbohydrate-binding proteins.
        • There are many different ones, and they are highly specific for specific types of sugar.
        • Many are found in our bodies and some have vital roles in our health.
        • There are lectins in every form of life.
        • The original branding of the Paleo diet as anti-lectin is somewhat misleading.
          • Paleo aims to eliminate prolamines and agglutinins, which are most problematic for our intestines and hard for our bodies to break down.
          • A recent studied showed that even in healthy people, gliadin fragments were shown to trick the gut cells into bringing them into the body, where then bind with receptors in the liver and fat cells and turn on signals to gain weight.
          • It is important for us to be more specific in describing the two classes of lectins we aim to avoid.
          • A frame work that generalizes all lectins and advocates omitting all of them from the diet is misunderstanding the science.
        • Nightshades have agglutinins, which are toxic lectins, and problematic.
          • Nightshades are a different botanical group with most being toxic to humans.
        • Anti-nutrients do tend to be concentrated in the peels of fruits and vegetables.
          • The peels are often also where higher antioxidant content is as well.
        • The only fruits and vegetables to arguably eliminate because of toxic lectin content are those in the Nightshade family (which are technically fruit).
        • The big picture is that every food may have positives and negatives, for example: dairy and coffee.
          • It is easy to to take part of the information and focus on just the bad.
          • We try to take a more holistic approach when we're talking about foods and our individual needs.
          • Everyone is different, so you have to test what works for you.
        • Seeing zucchini on the list of veggies to avoid made Stacy laugh because it is one of the most mild vegetables and isn't on any many other "no" lists; it is tolerated well by most people.
      • Listener Sarah was curious how to explain the testimonies of all the people being helped by The Plant Paradox diet.
        • This diet also eliminates a lot of other things that are problematic for a lot of people.
        • Something like the Paleo Diet or Autoimmune Protocol are two options much more founded in science, that recognize bio-individuality, and endorse self-experimentation to figure out what works for each person.
        • In Paleo Principles, Sarah aimed to be extremely clear about the current boundries of human knowledge regarding food.
          • Many foods are not black and white, having both pros and cons.
          • Sarah doesn't subscribe to a dogmatic approach, even regarding gluten.
          • There are over 1400 references in Paleo Principles, and is based on a much more sophisticated ground than simply "all lectins are bad."
    • OXALATES: Listener Rita wants to know about oxalates and the recommendation to avoid them.
      • Oxalate is in a similar category as phytate because it binds to minerals and makes them less absorbable by our bodies and are considered by some to be "anti-nutrients."

        • The minerals can be liberated by our gut bacteria.
      • Our bodies also produce oxalates, as a product of metabolism.
      • Many high oxalate foods like kale, collards, spinach, chard, most berries and nuts, sweet potatoes, chocolate, cruciferous veggies, beets, cassava, rhubarb, etc can still be part of a healthy Paleo diet.
        • To remove all these foods would be very limiting.
      • There is no medical definition for oxalate sensitivity like there is for other types of sensitivities.
        • The mechanism is not well-understood.
        • It usually refers to people who are prone to kidney stones or muscle and joint pain when they eat high-oxalate foods.
          • Some people produce a lot of oxalates, which they have a hard time eliminating, causing calcium-oxalate crystals in the kidneys, which develop into stones.
          • If oxalate concentrations become too high in the blood, they can build up in the joints causing oxalate arthritis.
            • 1 in 3 million people are genetically pre-disposed to these conditions.
            • People with absorption disorders (like Crohn's disease) are more prone also.
      • Dietary oxalates don't proportionately increase urinary oxalates.
        • We have a variety of biologically mechanisms to control our oxalate levels.

          • Certain gut bacteria work to degrade oxalates and reduce absorption.

            • This why someone with a gut disorder might be more prone to problems with oxalates.
            • You can increase these type of bacteria by eating more oxalates. Feed them!
        • Dehydration is the number one cause of oxalate stones and crystals.
        • Calcium supplementation and deficiency increase risk of stones.
          • To avoid this, eat plenty of dietary Calcium.
      • The arguments against eating oxalates are only valid for a limited specific number of people.
      • It is a myth that eating oxalates or phytates will suck nutrients from your body.
        • They are by definition already bound to minerals and therefore can't bind with anything else.
        • Our gut bacteria can liberate the minerals.
        • The minerals in the vegetable might be harder for us to absorb because of the reliance on gut health.
        • These vegetables aren't full of things that are going to sop up all the minerals in our bodies and make us deficient in minerals.
        • These foods feed beneficial bacteria and by that mechanism can actually help reduce risk of stones and encourage oxalate homeostasis.
      • There is a lot of overlap between oxalate, histamine, and salicylate food lists.
        • When oxalate sensitivity is based only on symptoms, it could be misunderstanding.
        • The symptoms of these intolerances are all similar.
        • It could be beneficial to investigate further into which sensitivity you are actually dealing with.
      • There isn't a compelling reason to eliminate high oxalate food for most people.
      • Stacy used to partly cook spinach and be careful about eating it with other foods to avoid absorption issues.
        • Sarah says, "it's not a thing!"
        • Eating raw spinach with other foods isn't going to inhibit absorption of nutrients from other food.
        • The presence of a compound bound with a mineral doesn't mean other nutrients will not be absorbed.
          • It means the mineral it is bound to requires being unbound before you can absorb it.
        • Eat spinach. Spinach is great! Eat it however you like it.
      • There are tests you can do through your doctor to determine oxalate levels or oxalate sensitivity.
        • This should not be diagnosed based on symptoms alone. Test for it if you suspect it.
      • Oxalate sensitivity is a very low frequency sensitivity.
        • "It's the candida of food sensitivities."

          • Very frequently diagnosed by symptoms and often not actually candida.
        • Plug for functional medicine- they actually test and have knowledgeable ways of dealing with things.
    • If you have more vegetable related questions, reach out through the contact forms on our websites or social media.
    • If you've enjoyed the show, please recommend it to someone who might enjoy it.
      • We love when you share and when you leave reviews for us!
    • Stacy will have a Self-Love post new on the blog, based on a talk she is giving soon!
    • Thanks for listening, we'll be back next week!

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Ep. 285: Stacy and Sarah Practice Self-Care

In this episode, we recap what we've been doing and how we've been keeping our health!

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If you enjoy the show, please review it in iTunes!

 

The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 285: Stacy and Sarah Practice Self-Care

  • Intro (0:00)
  • News and Views (0:40)
    • Stacy is home from her trip- she took a red eye home last week from the West coast. She was able to sleep on the plane and is feeling human again after only a couple days.
    • Sarah remembers her last red eye flight- it was awful and she got sick when returning home after book tour.
    • Stacy is catching up on her day job work and her "Passion Projects" after being gone.
    • Sarah loves what she does so much, that it doesn't feel like "work," so she finds herself "working" a lot.
    • Stacy wanted to go on this particular trip, even though it wasn't the best timing, because it was something that would allow her to affect change.
      • Stacy is learning to focus more on doing the things that bring her joy, that make a difference, and that also financially support her family.
    • Type A people who also have autoimmune issues have to be extra careful about policing themselves and avoiding too much stress.
      • There is a link between Type A personality and chronic illness.
      • It's a challenge to prioritize self-care.
        • Sarah recommends thinking about self-care needs as part of her job and as something just as important as anything else on her to-do list.
        • On that note, the show this week is just a check-in because Stacy has been traveling and Sarah is in the middle of her AIP Lecture Series.
    • The AIP Lecture Series has been so much fun Sarah, its one of her "Passion Projects."
      • It has allowed her to explain the material in a more in-depth way and in a different way than in writing.
      • The feedback Sarah is getting has been overwhelmingly positive.
      • Sarah tries to bridge the entire range of needs, from someone who just got a diagnosis or even suspects they have an autoimmune condition, or has never made any dietary changes, to the person who has been doing AIP for years and just needs refining... and everything in between.
      • It's very rewarding and fun to hear stories of how people are healing, and feeling better than ever because of this series- the level of connection she has with people through this course makes this possible.
      • Sarah feels like she has found her element in this course- she plans to do another!
      • The course contains 16 hours of lectures, plus videos in the private Facebook group, along with guides, printables, and action steps.
        • The complete scientific foundation for the autoimmune protocol: diet, lifestyle, practical how-tos.
        • Think of it as a community college course for your health.
        • All of the "why's" with practical "how to do this" wrapped in it.
        • The next session starts March 18th, 2018 - reserve your spot now here!
    • Stacy was exposed to the flu three different times on her trip and didn't catch it! Knock on wood!
      • "Souping" is probably what did amazing things for Stacy's immune system and saved her.
      • Even after having nightshades and alcohol before traveling, her body felt great.
      • She had bone broth, dried mango (vitamin C!) and lots of veggies all weekend at her conference.
      • Stacy took some essential oils with as well, to help protect her from all the yuk.
    • Sarah's pulling back the curtain on Stacy- she actually is a positive ball of energy, though she sometimes pretends she's not!
      • Sarah confirms that you can hug her and she'll even hug you back!
    • We'll be back again next week, and we've got some awesome shows lined up for the next couple weeks!
    • Thanks everyone for listening!
    • Outro (25:46)

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Ep. 284: Coconut: Superfood or Gut Irritant

In this episode, we talk about coconuts and how awesome they are in so many ways! But we also talk about how some people, particularly people on the AIP, find that they don't work well for them.

Click here to listen in iTunes

or download and listen by clicking the PodBean Player below

If you enjoy the show, please review it in iTunes!

 

The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 284: Coconut: Superfood or Gut Irritant

  • Intro (0:00)
  • News and Views (0:40)
    • Stacy and Sarah are celebrating 284 episodes as podcast co-hosts.
    • The Paleo View is approaching 5 million downloads- thank you!
    • Stacy celebrated herself (self-care) this week by buying new pajamas.
      • The old ones were nearly disintegrated.
      • She picked out exactly what she wanted, they arrived, and they're wonderful.
      • Sarah was once in an ambulance and was grateful she was wearing underwear without holes, as her mother had always told her do because of this very situation.
    • It's been chilly weather in Georgia for Sarah
      • Sarah's girls have had many of "snow days."
      • Sarah got to build a snowman, snow fort, and snow angels!
    • Primal Kitchen Chocolate Collagen Fuel makes the most amazing hot chocolate! Stacy served it to the boys for their recent snow day, and even the neighbor kids liked it.
  • Science with Sarah (10:42)
    • What's the deal with coconut? Why are so many treats made with coconut, and is it good or bad for us?
    • Annalise asks: "What exactly is it in coconut that many people on the Autoimmune diet seem to be reactive to? Is it salicylates, the fact that its on the FODMAP list, or something else? It's frustrating to have so many AIP treats out of reach, and I'd love to understand more. PS: great meeting you on book tour Sarah."
      • Coconut is a unique ingredient.
      • People new to the Paleo diet can find it overwhelming because there are so many things made with it.
    • What are the good and bad about coconut?
      • Even though it has "nut" in the name, it is not a nut. It's a "drupe." Coconuts do not have the same reactive properties of tree nuts.
      • Always check with your allergist if you have a tree nut allergy before eating coconut.
      • The nutrient make up of coconut is unique and unlike any other food.
      • Coconut is high in MCT oil, which doesn't require bile salts to be absorbed into the small intestine.
        • MCTs can be passively absorbed because they are small molecules.
        • MCTs are converted rapidly in the liver into ketone bodies, which can be used as energy.
      • Coconut has many other great nutrients: vitamins C and E, most Bs, high fiber, and phytosterols- which have been shown to lower LDL cholesterol.
      • Coconut also contains copper, iron, selenium, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, and zinc.
      • Coconut oil has potent anti-microbial properties.
      • MCTs are a special fat because they are known to reduce inflammatory mediators, increase mucous production in the gut, and increase the secretion of IgA antibodies in the gut (which can be good and bad).
      • For Stacy, coconut oil doesn't work well for her internally or externally.
        • Digestion has been better since eliminating it.
        • Skin is improved after not cleansing with it or using deodorants with coconut oil.
        • Listen to your body and don't try to "push through" and use something just because it works for everyone else or it is generally regarded as healthy.
      • Coconut is a high FODMAP food, specifically containing a high amount of inulin.
        • Inulin is highly-fermentable, which can cause problems for someone with bacterial overgrowth.
      • Coconut Flour
        • Coconut flour is high in inulin, which can be problematic for some people.
        • Until Otto's Cassava Flour came along, coconut flour was the only flour for AIP baking.
        • Stacy doesn't care for recipes with large amounts of coconut flour; Sarah finds it to be very dry.
      • Coconut Oil
        • The more refined the coconut oil is, the less it smells like a tropical beach.
        • Sarah uses Tropical Traditions Gold Label Coconut Oil for cooking and as a makeup remover.
        • Sarah cooks with coconut oil, as well as a myriad of other fats; she likes to mix it up!
      • Coconut Aminos
        • Coconut aminos is a fantastic soy sauce substitute.
        • It is made from coconut nectar/sugar.
      • Coconut Sugar
        • Sarah is myth busting on coconut sugar!

          • Coconut sugar still contains sugar, there are mixed studies on its glycemic index.
          • Coconut sugar isn't necessarily better than any other refined granulated sugar.
          • Stacy's general takeaway about sugars is that if something is sweet, there's a reason for it. Pick your poison, and know that its a poison.
        • Coconut nectar, sugar, and aminos are all made from the sap, obtained from the flowering stems of the tree.
          • This is controversial because of sustainability issues.
          • Sarah's understanding is that the companies they buy from are practicing sustainable, regenerative farming practices, but it isn't a guarantee.
          • Taking a deeper look a brands and their practices is something Stacy likes to do, especially for palm and coconut products, chocolate, and bananas.
      • Coconut Milk & Coconut Cream
      • Coconut Milk Powder is a wonderful, versatile ingredient!
      • Coconut water is high in minerals and electrolytes.
        • Stacy finds coconut water repulsive. Sarah describes it as coconuts wearing sweaty socks.
        • Some brands are better than others, and it is better when chilled.
        • Sarah can tell she is low in electrolytes (like after a workout) when coconut water doesn't taste terrible.
        • Coconut water is a fantastic "sports drink" because of its lower sugar and high nutrient content.
        • It is also used to make coconut vinegar.
    • If you enjoy the podcast, please share it with someone you think would enjoy it too, or leave us a review on itunes.
    • Using the links in this post and on our blogs helps support our podcast.
    • Social media algorithms have changed and you might not see much of our content there anymore. The best way to connect with us is to receive our weekly newsletter.
  • Thanks everyone for listening!
  • Outro (56:48)

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Ep. 283: Handling Critics, Conflicts and Vegans

In this episode, we talk about conflicts with people, especially vegans, about the paleo diet and how to defend your choices.

Click here to listen in iTunes

 

If you enjoy the show, please review it in iTunes!

 

The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 283: Handling Critics, Conflicts and Vegans

  • News and Views (0:41)

    • Wow! It's been 5 and a half years of podcasting! We've really evolved over these years!
    • Reminder about Sarah's AIP Lecture series!
    • We're in the season where you'll encounter well meaning people who want to challenge your diet choices and there's a ton of new vegan propaganda documentaries out there.
    • Sarah's takedown of What the Health is here.
    • Sarah thinks that Stacy, a reformed vegetarian, might have insight on how to handle social situations
  • Monique says (10:09), "Hi Stacy and Sarah! Thanks for your amazing work in promoting health and wellness. I am not new to Paleo and have been a fan of you both for a while but only recently started listening to your podcasts on my daily walks. So, my question is this: how do you approach vegetarians, vegans, or pro-plant based people in a social setting who talk smack about the Paleo diet and claim that meat eaters are unhealthy, sluggish, ignorant, selfish, etc? I usually either get mad and start going off about how they overload on grains and don't actually eat a lot of vegetables compared to Paleo, say nothing, or talk about how a diet based in vegetables, fruits, and animal protein has drastically changed my life for the better. I don't necessarily have a problem with vegetarianism/veganism (I have a couple of meatless meals per week), but it's not a lifestyle that's sustainable and healthiest for me full time - a Paleo template is. What is your way of approaching these situations?"
    • If someone is aggressive and trolly at you, don't engage! It won't turn out well.
    • And sometimes you have to agree to disagree.
    • If someone is vegetarian for religious reasons, we don't think it's appropriate to question it.
    • Stacy is reminded of eating with Matt as a vegetarian and being repulsed by his rare burger. They eventually changed their views due to intellectual exploration.
    • There is common ground on animal welfare between paleo and vegans. We both want animals to live as close to natural lives as possible and to live cruelty-free lives.
    • Also, growing corn, soy and wheat is hard on the planet.
    • Beef is better than chicken, too. You take fewer lives per meal and its better for you.
    • Sarah points out that eating nose to tail is more respectful, less wasteful and better for your health
    • Sarah considers paleo to be a plant based diet and is shocked that some paleo people think you only need meat. The evidence is very strong that we are omnivores!
    • Stacy is reminded of her brother, the twinkie vegan. He's only interested in not eating animals, not in health benefits.
    • Break down what's most important to the other person and address it from their concerns. Listen to what they have to say!
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  • Outro (42:46)

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Ep. 282: Joint Health, Arthritis, and Why We Eat All the Soup, Broth, and Collagen

In this episode, Stacy and Sarah discuss joint health and rheumatoid arthritis and why they recommend collagen for all joint issues!

Click here to listen in iTunes

If you enjoy the show, please review it in iTunes!

The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 282: Joint Health, Arthritis, and Why We Eat All the Soup, Broth, and Collagen

  • News and Views (0:41)

    • Looks like a ton of you are Souping! Thanks for sharing on social media!
    • Stacy's IgA Deficiency post is here
    • Stacy is into broth and collagen because shes concerned with her joint health. Her grandmother had Arthritis and her joint pain and joint cracking started very young.
    • Rheumatoid Arthritis affects 1.5 million adults and it's one of the most common autoimmune diseases.
    • Sarah was diagnosed with it at 28. They said "It won't be debilitating for ten years!"
    • Joints and spines don't have a lot of blood flow, so they heal very slowly.
    • Arthritis is an autoimmune condition in which the immune system attacks the joints and they stiffen up
    • Collagen and gelatin are good for joints because they are high in glycine, the amino acid important in forming bones, skin, and cartilage.
    • You can incorporate broth into anything! If it simmers away then the nutrients are staying!
    • See Stacy's Souping post for lots of recipes plus our Broth and Stock and Bones Tutorial for how to make it right!. Also, we love these Hot Chocolate Squares from Real Food RN.
    • Sarah recommends Avocado as well. Especially in pudding form. She uses the Practical Paleo recipe as well as the PaleOMG recipe
    • Sarah says the Real Life Paleo Phased Approach is really good for transition.
    • And if your vitamin deficient, you might want to supplement, particularly Vitamin D. But don't overdo it!
    • In terms of lifestyle factors, first quit smoking!
    • Less sleep makes you more sensitive to pain and sleeping more decreases symptoms of arthritis! So get to bed!
    • Stacy recommends that you not drink caffeine in the afternoon at all for sleep quality.
    • Stacy's back injury recovery.
    • Vital Proteins not only has Type II Collagen pills, but also great collagen and gelatin supplements!
  • Please Rate and review us!
  • Outro (42:46)

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Ep. 280: How Many Vegetables?!

In this episode, Stacy and Sarah discuss the health benefits of vegetables and how many you should be eating.

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The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 281: How Many Vegetables?!

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Ep. 280: Just BLEEPing Love Yourself

In this episode, Stacy and Sarah discuss the health ramifications of an on-again, off-again approach to healthy eating

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The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 280: Just BLEEPing Love Yourself

  • News and Views (0:41)

    • Stacy's heard a lot of talk about "yo-yo" Paleo; doing 30-day challenges then eating all the pizza
    • She wants to talk about loving our bodies instead!
    • It's especially prevalent this time of year, whether it's keto, a cleanse, etc.
    • Science! Sarah says remembering that stress is both physical and mental is helpful.
    • Many changes create a stress on our bodies.
    • Stochastic change, or an element of randomness, is helpful in some areas of health according to research, like working out at different time, occasionally varying calorie intake, could be good stressors.
    • Big switches in macronutrient ratios create stress on the body, and swinging back and forth creates too much stress.
    • Our bodies get used to producing certain amounts of digestive enzymes, and big shifts can create imbalances, and imbalances in gut bacteria (usually bad bacteria grow rapidly).
    • These, in turn, produce neuroactive compounds, which can cause not only GI symptoms but mood swings.
    • That doesn't even take into account how many inflammatory compounds you're eating, challenge to our metabolisms and lack of nutrient diversity we're facing.
    • Stacy points out that if we're loving ourselves, we don't NEED these big changes.
    • Sarah says it's okay to make the conscientious choice to choose what's not best for you once in a while, you're challenging your body with a little stochastic randomness that might actually be beneficial
    • Stacy says it's important to focus on your long-term goals.
    • When Sarah has a craving, she indulges—but she also asks herself if lifestyle factors like sleep or stress are causing that craving and adjusts accordingly.
    • Mindset shifts are helpful. What can you do with gusto that will achieve the same result?
    • Sarah likes body scan meditations.
    • Happy New Year and thank you for listening, we're approaching 5 million downloads (a lot from our 6 listeners!).
  • Please Rate and review us!
  • Outro (50:50)

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Ep. 279: Sarah and the Tonsillectomy

In this episode, Sarah talks about her decision to proceed with a tonsillectomy for her daughter.

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or download and listen by clicking the PodBean Player below

If you enjoy the show, please review it in iTunes!

The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 279: Sarah and the Tonsillectomy

  • News and Views (0:41)

    • Stacy thanks you for your well wishes on the anniversary of her brother Andrew's death
    • Sarah's daughter recently had a tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy after a long struggle to get her tonsils back to normal.
    • Sarah and her family have a history of having inflamed tonsils.
    • While there is a small role for tonsils, possibly as a early warning system for the immune system, you can easily live without them.
    • Sarah had a lot of antibiotics for strep because of tonsils and wonders how that affected her health.
    • Her daughter also had a lot of strep as well despite a healthy lifestyle. Recently, that had increased in frequency as well.
    • This summer, the tonsils had swollen and wouldn't go back down to the point of affecting her sleep. They had to come out.
    • She had the surgery and also had her adenoids out at the same time.
    • Sarah has been giving her recovery foods, but feels guilty that they are juice and popsicles.
    • DON'T WORRY about such things! You are getting her through a tough time!
    • Remember: make the best decisions you can for your kids and don't dwell on what could have been.
    • And medicine is not the enemy! It will save your life!
  • Please Rate and review us!
  • Outro (35:52)

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Ep. 278: Diana Rodgers

In this episode, Diana Rodgers comes on to talk about Kale Vs. Cow

Click here to listen in iTunes

or download and listen by clicking the PodBean Player below

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The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 278: Diana Rodgers

  • News and Views (0:41)

    • Our guest this week is Diana Rodgers from Sustainable Dish!
    • Diana is a nutritionist/dietician and runs her own farm!
    • Diana is starting a film project called Kale Vs. Cow to combat the vegan propaganda films, focusing on why cows are great to eat
    • Go to her Generosity page to help fund the project!
  • Please Rate and review us!
  • Outro (52:06)

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